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March 2012

Oracle (finally) announces support for Oracle Database 11gR2 on OEL6

Over a year after first releasing Oracle Enterprise Linux 6, Oracle finally announced Thursday that it will support running Oracle Databases on Oracle Enterprise Linux 6 (OEL6). Currently, the certification is only valid with the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK).

April 5 Webinar (sponsored by Embarcadero)

I'll be conducting a webinar entitled Best Practices for Developing Optimally Performing SQL on April 5. Embarcadero is sponsoring the event as part of their commitment to support the Oracle community with growth and learning opportunities.

The webinar will be offered twice on April 5.
- 6:00 am PDT / 9:00 am EDT / 13:00 GMT / 2 pm in UK
or
- 11:00am PDT / 2:00pm EDT / 18:00 GMT / 7 pm in UK

I'm normally hesitant to use the label "Best Practices" as I think things often get labeled as such and people forget to test and verify them in context of their own situations and end up creating as many problems as they attempt to solve. So my list of best practices doesn't include specific do's and don'ts. My list is more about how to approach SQL development with a strong emphasis on several key areas:

OUGN 2012 Second Day – Out on the Open Seas

As I said yesterday, I am not one for blogging about conferences. So what the heck, I’ll do another post on this one :-) .

You might have picked up on the fact that I am not very good on the sea and have a lot of nervousness about this idea of spending 2 days on an ocean-going liner. So today is the day we move over to being on the water, the OUGN conference proper. I’m delighted to say I am not the only one nervous about this boat lark, Marie Colgan {or, as I should be calling her, “The Optimizer Lady” – since Doug Burns christened her back at the UKOUG 2011 conference} feels the same. There is nothing better to reduce one’s apprehension about something than finding someone else who is just as if not more anxious about it. I suspect this is an evil way to think but I can’t help it.

Monitoring Changes to Table Data

March 22, 2012 Suppose that you receive a request stating that a particular table in one of your databases must be monitored for changes.  One such table might be the one that lists the ERP system’s suppliers and their addresses – you would not want someone to be able to set up a legitimate supplier, and later [...]

Oracle Database Certified on OL6/RHEL6 (at last)…

I can hardly believe it. It’s finally happened!!!

Check out the story here.

The certification matrix on MOS is not updated yet, and those on RHEL kernel will have to wait a few more days (90), but at last we have some firm commitment. :)

From now on, the Oracle Linux errata are available free from http://public-yum.oracle.com. In the past only the updates (5.6, 5.7 etc.) were available. This makes OL even more useful than before.

Thank you!

Cheers

Tim…

Update: Remember, if you apply the errata to OL6.2, you will have the same scsi_id issue I saw with 5.8.

Oracle Database 11g Certification For RHEL6 / OEL6 Has Finally Materialized!

Big news, short post.  I fully expected Oracle to skip certifying 11g on RHEL6 / OEL6 opting instead to encourage (force?) adoption of the next major release 12c.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/oracle-announces-certification-oracle-database-192400398.html

Patents

If you you want to get an idea how some feature may be implemented by Oracle, then you ought to have a look for patents. Here are several examples I find quite interesting and containing valuable information:

Good Forever

Oracle 10.2.0.1 (I know, version out-of-date) on Windows 2003:

The other day one of my stored procedures error’ed out with:

ORA-01801: date format is too long for internal buffer

somewhere near a line in which I was doing the following assignment:

d := to_char(c.date_field,'YYYYMMDD');

Where d is of type varchar2, and c is a row from a cursor for loop, and date_field is a date column in the cursor

selecting the date field from the database didn’t look odd:

select date_field from table_name t where t.id = ;

’04-AUG-17′

However, selecting to_char did yield something odd:

select to_char(date_field,'YYYYMMDD') from table_name t where t.id = ;

’00000000′

Odd, no 04, no AUG and no 17.

At this point I could tell something was up with the data in the field, so I resorted to dump’ing it’s contents:

ACS

You’ve probably heard about adaptive cursor sharing, and possibly you’ve wondered why you haven’t seen it happening very often on your production systems (assuming you’re running a modern version of Oracle). Here’s a little bug/fix that may explain the non-appearance.

MOS Doc ID 9532657.8 Adaptive cursor sharing ignores SELECTs which are not fully fetched.

This bug is confirmed in 11.2.0.1, and fixed in 11.2.0.3. The problem is that the ACS code doesn’t process the statistical information from the cursor unless the cursor reaches “end of fetch” – i.e. if you don’t select all the data in your query, Oracle doesn’t consider the statistics of that execution when deciding whether or not to re-optimise a statement.