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September 2014

About index range scans, disk re-reads and how your new car can go 600 miles per hour!

Despite the title, this is actually a technical post about Oracle, disk I/O and Exadata & Oracle In-Memory Database Option performance. Read on :)

If a car dealer tells you that this fancy new car on display goes 10 times (or 100 or 1000) faster than any of your previous ones, then either the salesman is lying or this new car is doing something radically different from all the old ones. You don’t just get orders of magnitude performance improvements by making small changes.

Perhaps the car bends space around it instead of moving – or perhaps it has a jet engine built on it (like the one below :-) :

12c In-Memory on RAC

I started looking into In-Memory on RAC this week. Data can be distributed across RAC nodes in a couple of different ways. The default is to spread it across the available nodes in the cluster. So if you had a 2 node cluster, roughly 50% of the data in your table or partition would be loaded into the column store in each of the 2 instances.

Migrating to ASM

On the Maximum Availability Architecture website, there’s a paper on Best Practices for Database Consolidation. It’s a great paper, as you’d expect from the MAA guys (well, apart from that awful term alert I had to add! :) ). Since database consolidation is an area I work in a lot, I thought I’d start looking at implementing as much of their recommendations as I could in Enterprise Manager, which of course is my tool of choice.

Oaktable World

Oaktable World 2014
Event date: 
Mon, 2014-09-29 - Tue, 2014-09-30

Monday Sept 29 and Tuesday Sept 30, same location as last year.

Jonathan Lewis explains Delphix live Sept 18th

Join myself and Tim Gorman as we host a live webinar  and Q&A September 18th at 10am PST  with Jonathan Lewis. Jonathan will explain from his on experiences how Delphix works and what industry problems it solves.

#222222;">#444444;">#bd2028;">#bd2028;">Click here to register for our webinar.

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Using Ansible for executing Oracle DBA tasks.

This post looks like I am jumping on the bandwagon of IT orchestration like a lot of people are doing. Maybe I should say ‘except for (die hard) Oracle DBA’s’. Or maybe not, it up to you to decide.

Most people who are interested in IT in general will have noticed IT orchestration has gotten attention, especially in the form of Puppet and/or Chef. I _think_ IT orchestration has gotten important with the rise of “web scale” (scaling up and down applications by adding virtual machines to horizontal scale resource intensive tasks), in order to provision/configure the newly added machines without manual intervention, and people start picking it up now to use it for more tasks than provisioning of virtual machines for web applications.

Temporal Validity, ACLs, External Tables, SQL*Loader and more in Oracle 12c

Some more 12c articles have trickled out over the last few days.

Learning for yourself!

This subject comes up again and again. See:

In a freaky coincidence, two people asked virtually the same thing of me yesterday and I answered each of them individually, but it paved the way for this post.

In the first case, the person asked me several questions about getting better at Oracle. This is part of my reply.

Delphix

Update: I’ve been trying to embed the recording of the presentation in this note, but haven’t quite got there yet; however here’s a URL for the recording.

 

I’ve often found in my travels that I’ve come up with a (potential) solution to a problem and wanted to test it “right now” – only to run onto the horns of a dilemma. A typical client offers me one of two options:

Scottish Independence

Anyone watching the UK news will know we are living in turbulent times. In a few days the people of Scotland will decide if they are going to become independent. I believe the people have the right to decide what happens to them, so if the “Yes” vote comes out on top I wish them well. What does seem interesting is people on either side of the debate making very definitive statements about the success or failure of independence when a couple of very important points are yet to be decided.