Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

July 2018

Extended Histograms

Today’s little puzzle comes courtesy of the Oracle-L mailing list. A table has two columns (c2 and c3), which contain only the values ‘Y’ and ‘N’, with the following distribution:


select   c2, c3, count(*)
from     t1
group by c2, c3
;

C C   COUNT(*)
- - ----------
N Y       1994
Y N      71482

2 rows selected.

The puzzle is this – how do you get the optimizer to predict a cardinality of zero (or, using its best approximation, 1) if you execute a query where the predicate is:

where   c2 = 'N' and c3 = 'N'

Here are 4 tests you might try:

FAQ: Webinars for “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices”

I’ve been somewhat inundated with questions regarding the “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” webinar series I’ll be running in October and November since I announced both webinar series last week. So I’ve compiled the following list of frequently asked questions which I’m hoping will address most of those asked. If you have any additional […]

All about headroom and mandatory patching before June 2019

This post was triggered upon rereading a blogpost by Mike Dietrich called databases need patched minimum april 2019. Mike’s blogpost makes it clear this is about databases that are connected using database links, and that:
– Newer databases do not need additional patching for this issue (11.2.0.4, 12.1.0.2, 12.2 and newer).
– Recent PSU patches contain a fix for certain older versions (11.1.0.7, 11.2.0.3 and 12.1.0.1).
– This means versions 11.2.0.2 and earlier 11.2 versions, 11.1.0.6 and earlier and anything at version 10 or earlier can not be fixed and thus are affected.

But what is the actual issue?

RAC One node databases are relocated by opatchauto in 12.2 part 1

This is an interesting observation I wanted to share. I have a feeling as if there didn’t seem to be too much information out there for RAC One Node (RON) users, and I hope this helps someone thinking about patching his system.

RAC-rolling patching is well documented in patch readme files, blog posts and official white papers. Most RAC DBAs have a solid handle on the procedure. Patching RAC One Node is a different affair.

What happens when patching a RAC One Node system? As the name suggests a RAC One Node database is a cluster database restricted to one active instance in normal operations. It is possible to relocate the database from one node to another online. Oracle does this by temporarily adding a second instance to the cluster database with the intention of letting it take over from the source instance. At the end of the online relocation, the source instance is shut down, and only the destination instance remains up and running.

Power BI 101- Logging and Tracing, Part III

Power BI, like many Microsoft products, is multi-threaded.  This can be seen from the logs and even the Task Manager.  I know, I know…you’ve probably heard this part all before…

The importance of this information, is that the logs will display Process IDs, (PID) that are separate from the main Power BI Desktop executable, including the secondary processes..  Moving from the Power BI logs that reside in the Performance folder, (see Part I here) we can view and connect the PIDs and TID, (Transaction IDs) to information from the Task Manager and the data displayed:

Observations About the Scalability of Data Loads in ADWC

In the last days, I am running a number of tests based on the TPC-DS benchmark against Oracle’s Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service (ADWC). One of the first thing I did is of course to create the TPC-DS schema and populate it. The aim of this blog post is to share some observations related to the population step.

I started by generating the data with the tool provided by TPC-DS: dsdgen. With the following command, I generated 1TB of data:

$ dsdgen -scale 1000 -dir /data/tpcdsdata

The tool generated, in about 24 hours, the following files:

Humble pie made with NULL strings

I was helping out a client a while back with an issue where a panicked email came into my inbox along the lines of “SELECT IS BROKEN IN ORACLE!!!”, which seemed perhaps a little extreme Smile. So I pursued it further asking for some concrete details, and I must concede it had me a little bamboozled for a while. I’ve simplified the example to keep it easy to digest, but the premise is the same.

My colleague had a table with a couple of VARCHAR2 columns:

image

Hyper-partitioned index avoidance thingamajig

As you can tell, I have no idea on a name for what I am about to describe. So let me start from the beginning, and set the scene for an idea I have to utilize a cool new 18c feature.

Often in a transactional-style system the busiest table (let us call it SALES for the sake of this discussion) is also

  • the biggest table, after all, it has all of our sales in it,
  • the most demanded for table, in that, almost every query in our application wants to access it in some way shape or form.

This is in effect the database version of the Pareto Principle. Everyone wants a slice of that SALES “pie”, and the piece of that pie that is in most demand is typically the most recent data. Your application may have pages that will be showing:

18.3 As easy as 1…2…3

Well, finally it’s here! 18c for on-premise installation so the world can all get stuck into the cool new features of the latest release on their own laptops Smile  At least that is what I’ll be doing!

Naturally as soon as I heard the news, I downloaded the software and got ready to set aside the day for installation and creation of an 18c database. But I didn’t need that long – I didn’t need that long at all. Just a few clicks and a few commands and there it was – my 18c database up and running.

Check out how easy it is with my three videos.

Software Installation

Little things worth knowing: Creating a RAC One Node database on the command line

This post is going to be super short, and mostly just a note to myself as I constantly forget how to create a RAC One database on the command line. This post is for 12.2.0.1 but should be similar on 12.1 (although I didn’t test!).

Provided you are licensed appropriately, this is probably the most basic way how you create an admin-managed RAC One database on Linux for use in a lab environment: