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October 2018

Average Active Sessions - OTW2018

John Beresniewicz presents this lightning talk during the OTW 2018 unconference in San Francisco.

 

NoSQL is Anti Relational - OTW2018

John Beresniewicz presents this lightning talk during the OTW 2018 unconference in San Francisco.

NoSQL is Anti Relational - OTW2018

John Beresniewicz presents this lightning talk during the OTW 2018 unconference in San Francisco.


otw2018 presentations

John Beresniewicz presents this lightning talk during the OTW 2018 unconference in San Francisco.

NoSQL is Anti Relational
Average Active Sessions

“Hidden” Efficiencies of Non-Partitioned Indexes on Partitioned Tables Part IV” (Hallo Spaceboy)

In Part I, Part II and Part III we looked at some advantages of Global Indexes that may not be obvious to some. One of the advantages of a Local Index vs. Non-Partitioned Global Index is that a Local Index being a smaller index structures may have a reduced BLEVEL in comparison. This can save […]

The strange place for INHERIT PRIVILEGES

A while back in an Office Hours session, I touched on a relatively new privilege in the database called INHERIT PRIVILEGES which is designed to avoid erroneous privilege escalation via AUTHID CURRENT_USER routines.

You can watch the full video below

Index Splits – 2

In yesterday’s article I described the mechanism that Oracle for an index leaf block split when you try to insert a new entry into a leaf block that is already full, and I demonstrated that the “50-50” split and the “90-10” split work in the same way, namely:

Using colplot to visualise performance data

Back in 2011 I wrote a blog post about colplot but at that time focused on running the plot engine backed by a web server. However some people might not want to take this approach, and thinking about security it might not be the best idea in the world anyway. A port that isn’t opened can’t be scanned for vulnerabilities…

So what is colplot anyway? And why this follow-up to a 7 year old post?

Index splits

After writing this note I came to the conclusion that it will be of no practical benefit to anyone …  but I’m publishing it anyway because it’s just an interesting little observation about the thought processes of some Oracle designer/developer. (Or maybe it’s an indication of how it’s sensible to re-use existing code rather than coding for a particular boundary case, or maybe it’s an example of how to take advantage of “dead time” to add a little icing to the cake when the extra time required might not get noticed). Anyway, the topic came up in a recent thread on the OTN/ODC database forum and since the description given there wasn’t quite right I thought I’d write up a correction and a few extra notes.