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March 2019

Stats advisor

This is just a little shout-out about the Stats Advisor – if you decide to give it a go, what sort of things is it likely to tell you. The answer is in a dynamic performance view called v$stats_advisor_rules – which I’ve list below from an instance running 18.3.0.0.

Intro: Initial Thoughts On Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud Services (Automatic For The People)

I’m currently writing up a few blog pieces on indexing in the Oracle Autonomous Database environments, but I thought I’ll begin by introducing what exactly are Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud Services and some of my initial thoughts, as there’s still some confusion on all this. Introduced by Uncle Larry at Oracle OpenWorld 2017, Oracle Autonomous […]

Lost time

Here’s a little puzzle that came up in the ODC database forum yesterday – I’ve got a query that has been captured by SQL Monitor, and it’s taking much longer to run than it should but the monitoring report isn’t telling me what I need to know about the time.

Here’s a little model to demonstrate the problem – I’m going to join a table to itself (the self join isn’t a necessary feature of the demonstration, I’ve just been a bit lazy in preparing data). Here’s a (competely truthful) description of the table:

Announcement: “Oracle Performance Diagnostics and Tuning” Webinar – 9-12 July 2019 !!

I’m very excited to announce the first public running of my new “Oracle Performance Diagnostics and Tuning” Webinar will run between 9-12 July 2019 (6pm-10pm AEST): Webinar Series 9-12 July 2019 (start 6pm AEST, end 10pm AEST):  This is a must attend seminar aimed at Oracle professionals (both DBAs and Developers) who are interested in Performance Tuning.  […]

Oracle vs. SQL Server Architecture

There are a lot of DBAs that are expected to manage both Oracle and MSSQL environments. This is only going to become more common as database platforms variations with the introduction of the cloud continue. A database is a database in our management’s world and we’re expected to understand it all.

Its not an easy topic, but I’m going to post on it, taking it step by step and hopefully the diagrams will help. Its also not an apple to apple comparison, so hopefully, but starting at the base and working my way into it with as similar as comparisons as I’m able to with features, it will make sense for those out there that need to understand it.

We have a number of customers that are migrating Oracle to Azure and many love Oracle and want to keep their Oracle database as is, just bringing their licenses over to the cloud. The importance of this is they may have Azure/SQL DBAs managing them, so I’m here to help.

Golang chatting with Oracle

Python is awesome. I like Python very much, but there are some cases where Python’s performance is just not enough. What other options do we have?
Well, there’s for example GoLang

Problem with GoLang is that there is not a lot on the Internet about using it with Oracle Databases. Let me show you some basic steps for configuring the environment.

The first step is to install GoLang – instructions can be found in here: https://golang.org/doc/install

To connect to Oracle, you need Oracle Client (it can be Oracle Instant Client).
I will configure my environment on my MAC and use Oracle Instant Client for MAC

Using dbca to create a physical standby database

While investigating new options I discovered with dbca for the previous article I noticed that it’s now possible to use Oracle’s Database Creation Assistant (dbca) to create a physical standby database using the -createDuplicateDB flag.

I wanted to know how easily this can be done on my Oracle 18.5.0 system. I have 2 VMs, server3 and server4 running Oracle Linux 7.6. I created the primary database on server3. The database name is NCDB with the db_unique_name set to SITEA. I also use SITEA as the database SID to prevent confusion. My physical standby database with db_unique_name SITEB will reside on server4.