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July 2019

Sometimes the Simplest Things Are the Most Important

I didn’t ride in First Class a lot during my career, but I can remember one trip, I was sitting in seat 1B. Aisle seat, very front row. Right behind the lavatory bulkhead. The lady next to me in 1A was very nice, and we traded some stories.

I can remember telling her during dinner, wow, just look at us. Sitting in an aluminum tube going 500 miles per hour, 40,000 feet off the ground. It’s 50º below zero out there. Thousands of gallons of kerosene are burning in huge cans bolted to our wings, making it all go. Yet here we sit in complete comfort, enjoying a glass of wine and a steak dinner. And just three feet away from us in that lavatory right there, a grown man is evacuating his bowels.

I said, you know, out of all the inventions that have brought us to where we are here today, the very most important one is probably that wall.

It’s back!

Yes indeed! Now that the dates and times are available for OpenWorld 2019, then it is naturally time for the best data searching, filtering and analysis tool on the planet to step up to the plate, enter the fray and …. hmmm… I’ve run out of metaphors </p />
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Ansible tips’n’tricks: checking if a systemd service is running

I have been working on an Ansible playbook to update Oracle’s Tracefile Analyser (TFA). If you have been following this blog over the past few months you might remember that I’m a great fan of the tool! Using Ansible makes my life a lot easier: when deploying a new system I can ensure that I’m also installing TFA. Under normal circumstances, TFA should be present when the (initial) deployment playbook finishes. At least in theory.

As we know, life is what happens when you’re making other plans, and I’d rather check whether TFA is installed/configured/running before trying to upgrade it. The command to upgrade TFA is different from the command I use to deploy it.

I have considered quite a few different ways to do this but in the end decided to check for the oracle-tfa service: if the service is present, TFA must be as well. There are probably other ways, maybe better ones, but this one works for me.

Running pgBench on YugaByteDB 1.3

Running pgBench on YugaByte DB 1.3

My first test on this Open Source SQL distributed database.

Did you hear about YugaByteDB, a distributed database with an architecture similar to Google Spanner, using PostgreSQL as the query layer?

I started to follow when I’ve heard that Bryn Llewellyn, famous PL/SQL and EBR product manager, left Oracle to be their developer advocate. And YugaByteDB got more attention recently when announcing that their product license is now 100% Open Source.

Oracle DBA_SQL_PLAN_BASELINE SQL_ID and PLAN_HASH_VALUE

There are probably better ways, so please let me know (@FranckPachot). This is what I use when I want to get the SQL_ID and the PLAN_HASH_VALUE when looking at the SQL Plan Baselines.

The DBA_SQL_PLAN_BASELINES view does not provide them, probably because SQL Plan Management (SPM) is going from a statement and it’s execution plan to the SQL Plan Baselines, but doesn’t need to navigate in the other way. However, we need it when troubleshooting query performance.

CockroachDB… true distributed system-of-record for the cloud

After exploring the analytics end of distributed NewSQL databases, I decided to explore true system-of-record in the cloud. Without a doubt, the future is moving to the cloud. CockroachDB is at the fore-front of this journey to be the backbone database for new micro-services in the cloud. Escape the legacy database rats nest that wasn’t designed to be truly distributed or in the cloud.

With CockroachDB, you can domicile data for regulatory reasons and ensure the best possible performance by accessing data locally. CockroachDB allows you to use create a SINGLE distributed database across multiple cloud providers and on-prem. Our self healing not only helps keep your data consistent, but it automates cloud-to-cloud migration without downtime.

Create an Oracle VM on Azure in Less than 5 Minutes

If there’s one thing I’ve been able to prove this week, it’s that even with the sweet 4G LTE, Wi-Fi setup in my RV, Montana still has the worst Wi-Fi coverage in the US.  Lucky for me, I work in the cloud and automate everything, because if there’s one thing I love about automating with scripts, is that I can build out a deployment faster and less resource intensive than anyone can from the portal.

Oracle Virtual Machines in Azure

When you build out an Azure VM, with Oracle, you’ll also need to have the supporting structure and a sufficiently sized additional disk for your database.  This can be a lot of clicks inside a portal, but from a script, a few questions and bam, you have everything you need.

RBAL (ospid: nnn): terminating the instance due to error 27625 after patching Oracle Restart

I have come across an odd behaviour trying to patch an Oracle Restart environment to 12.1.0.2 January 2019. Based on a twitter conversation this isn’t necessarily limited to my patch combination, there might be others as well. I have used opatchauto to apply patch 28813884 to both RDBMS and GRID homes plus its corresponding OJVM (Java) patch. Before diving into details, this is the environment I have been working with:

No risk to activate Active Data Guard by mistake with SQL Developer SQLcl

If you have a Data Guard configuration without the Active Data Guard license, you can:

  • apply the redo to keep the physical standby synchronized
  • or open the database read-only to query it

but not at the same time.

Risk with sqlplus “startup”

Being opened READ ONLY WITH APPLY requires the Active Data Guard option. But that this may happen by mistake. For example, in sqlplus you just type “startup”, instead of “startup mount”. The standby database is opened read-only. Then the Data Guard broker (with state APPLY-ON) starts MRP and the primary database records that you are using Active Data Guard. And then DBA_FEATURE_USAGE_STATISTICS flags the usage of: “Active Data Guard — Real-Time Query on Physical Standby”. And the LMS auditors will count the option.

The ways to prevent it are unsupported: