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18c

UTL_FILE_DIR and 18c revisited

A couple of years back (wow…time flies!) I made a video and a post about the de-support of UTL_FILE_DIR in 18c. This was good thing because the number of people opting for “utl_file_dir=*” in their init.ora file, and hence opening themselves up to all sorts of risks seemed to be large! (The post elaborates on this more with an example of erasing your database with a short UTL_FILE script Smile)

Video : Schema Only Accounts in Oracle Database 18c Onward

Today’s video is a demonstration of schema only accounts, introduced in Oracle Database 18c.

This is based on the following articles.

Group by Elimination

Here’s a bug that was highlighted a couple of days ago on the Oracle Developer Community forum; it may be particularly worth thinking about if if you haven’t yet got up to Oracle 12c as it appeared in an optimizer feature that appeared in 12.2 (and hasn’t been completely fixed) even in the latest release of 19c (currently 19.6).

Oracle introduce “aggregate group by elimination” in 12.2, protected by the hidden parameter “_optimizer_aggr_groupby_elim”. The notes on MOS about the feature tell us that Oracle can eliminate a group by operation from a query block if a unique key from every table in the query block appears in the group by clause. Unfortunately there were a couple of gaps in the implementation in 12.2 that can produce wrong results. Here’s some code to model the problem.

Initialising PL/SQL associative arrays in 18c and later

I can never remember how to initialise PL/SQL associative arrays and thought I’d write a short post about it. This is primarily based on an article on Oracle’s Ask Tom site, plus a little extra detail from Steven Feuerstein. Associative arrays were previously known as index-by tables, by the way.

Associative arrays before 18c

Prior to Oracle 18c, you had to initialise an associative array in a slightly cumbersome way, like so:

Drop Column bug

When I was a child I could get lost for hours in an encyclopedia because I’d be looking for one topic, and something in it would make me want to read another, and another, and …

The same thing happens with MOS (My  Oracle Support) – I search for something and the search result throws up a completely irrelvant item that looks much more interesting so I follow a hyperlink, which mentions a couple of other notes, and a couple of hours later I can’t remember what I had started looking for.

12.2.0.1 And Later Support (Limited) Extended Stats On Virtual columns / Column Groups of Expressions

I do have a demo as part of my optimizer related workshops that shows the restriction / limitation of DBMS_STATS not supporting extended statistics on virtual columns / group of expressions, so for example the combination of both expressions and column groups, like ((TRUNC(COL1)), (TRUNC(COL2))).

Surprisingly, when following a certain sequence of operation, this starts working (to some degree) from 12.2.0.1 on.

Single Value Column Frequency Histogram Oracle 12c and later

It is hopefully in the meantime well known that Oracle has introduced in version 11g a new algorithm to gather statistics on a table that no longer requires sorting for determining the critical Number Of Distinct Values (NDV) figure - it instead uses a clever "approximate NDV" algorithm which always reads 100% of the table data and therefore in principle generates very accurate statistics. This new algorithm gets used only when the ESTIMATE_PERCENT parameter to the DBMS_STATS.GATHER*STATS calls is left at default or explicitly passed as "DBMS_STATS.AUTO_SAMPLE_SIZE". This new algorithm is also required in case other new features like "Incremental Statistics" should be used.

In 12c Oracle improved this algorithm allowing the generation of Frequency and the new Top Frequency histogram types in a single pass. The new Hybrid histogram type still requires a separate pass.

push_having_to_gby() – 2

The problem with finding something new and fiddling with it and checking to see how you can best use it to advantage is that you sometimes manage to “break” it very quickly. In yesterday’s blog note I introduced the /*+ push_having_to_gby(@qbname) */ hint and explained why it was a useful little enhancement. I also showed a funny little glitch with a missing predicate in the execution plan.

Today I thought I’d do something a little more complex with the example I produced yesterday, and I’ve ended up with a little note that’s not actually about the hint, it’s about something that appeared in my initial testing of the hint, and then broke when I pushed it a little further. Here’s a script to create data for the new test:

push_having_to_gby()

I came across an interesting new hint recently when checking the Outline Data for an execution plan: /*+ push_having_to_gby() */  It’s an example of a “small” change designed to reduce CPU usage by reducing the volume of data that passes through the layers of calls that an execution plan represents. The hint appeared in 18.3 but I’ve run the following on 19.3 as a demonstration of what it does and why it’s a good thing:

Oracle Database 18c and 19c on Fedora 31

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Fedora 31 was released a couple of weeks ago and I’ve done some Oracle installations on it.

Just a warning to explain why this is a bad idea for anything real.

With that out of the way, here are the articles.