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Ara: ansible run analysis

This is a short blogpost meant as both an introduction for those who don’t know Ara and a guide on how to install Ara.
Ara means ‘Ansible Runtime Analysis’, and is a tool for storing metadata that Ansible uses during execution. It is very valuable, because it takes a lot of guesswork and entering debug statements in your playbook away.

This is a guide on how to install Ara on Oracle Linux 7. I assume ansible is already installed. If want to start fresh, add EPEL and yum install ansible and git. That’s all you need to begin!

First, become root and install ara using a playbook:

How to install the semaphore UI for running ansible

This blogpost is about how to install the semaphore user-interface for running ansible. Ansible is an automation language for automating IT infrastructures. It consists of command-line executables (ansible, ansible-playbook for example) that can run a single task using a module (using the ansible executable), or can run multiple tasks using multiple modules in order to perform more complex setup requirements (using the ansible-playbook executable). The downside of running IT tasks via the command-line is that there is no logging by default, unless someone decides to save the standard out to a file, which, if multiple people start doing that by hand will probably lead to a huge collection of text files which are hard to navigate. Also, when tasks are run via a common place, it’s an all or nothing situation: everybody has access to all the scripts, or to nothing.

A total unattended install of linux and the Oracle database.

This is a blogpost about how I setup my test virtual machines. The seasoned sysadmin and DBA will notice that the techniques used here are perfectly usable for real production environments. The most important thing is there is no need to download or stage any software for installing the virtual machine, everything is downloaded when needed during installation. Obviously this works best when you have got reasonable bandwidth available for connecting to the internet.

The main infrastructure software components of this setup are:
Virtualbox as the virtualisation software.
Ansible as the configuration and management engine.
Vagrant as the virtualisation manager.

Automation for DBA - Ansible part 1

Hello,

In this post I would like to move forward with software provisioning and configuration. In my last post I covered a ways to build a "core VM" and now it's a time to add some software and configuration to it.

There are couple of automation tools, which can be used for that task like Puppet, Chef or Ansible to name a few. The latter one - Ansible - is my favorite, cause in my opinion it has shortest learning curve and also doesn't require any agents on the remote servers.

Automation for DBA - Ansible part 1

Hello,

In this post I would like to move forward with software provisioning and configuration. In my last post I covered a ways to build a "core VM" and now it's a time to add some software and configuration to it.

There are couple of automation tools, which can be used for that task like Puppet, Chef or Ansible to name a few. The latter one - Ansible - is my favorite, cause in my opinion it has shortest learning curve and also doesn't require any agents on the remote servers.

How to avoid boring work

Over the past few years working as an IT consultant, I've learned that having easy access to a robust lab where I can learn or test solutions is critical. But my approach to building a test lab has changed over the years.
These days I prefer not to "build" a lab but to "define" one — it is a better use of my time.
Building requires a long step-by-step process of installing all the necessary components: OS, databases, app servers, one by one based on the documentation. 
Instead, I can define a lab using tools such as Ansible, Chef, Puppet, Oracle Enterprise Manager, on top of tools that manage Virtual Machines like Vagrant or libvirt.

How to avoid boring work

Over the past few years working as an IT consultant, I've learned that having easy access to a robust lab where I can learn or test solutions is critical. But my approach to building a test lab has changed over the years.
These days I prefer not to "build" a lab but to "define" one — it is a better use of my time.
Building requires a long step-by-step process of installing all the necessary components: OS, databases, app servers, one by one based on the documentation. 
Instead, I can define a lab using tools such as Ansible, Chef, Puppet, Oracle Enterprise Manager, on top of tools that manage Virtual Machines like Vagrant or libvirt.

Using Ansible for executing Oracle DBA tasks.

This post looks like I am jumping on the bandwagon of IT orchestration like a lot of people are doing. Maybe I should say ‘except for (die hard) Oracle DBA’s’. Or maybe not, it up to you to decide.

Most people who are interested in IT in general will have noticed IT orchestration has gotten attention, especially in the form of Puppet and/or Chef. I _think_ IT orchestration has gotten important with the rise of “web scale” (scaling up and down applications by adding virtual machines to horizontal scale resource intensive tasks), in order to provision/configure the newly added machines without manual intervention, and people start picking it up now to use it for more tasks than provisioning of virtual machines for web applications.