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New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.1 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version in particular supports now the new 12c "Adaptive" plan feature - previous versions don't cope very well with those if you don't add the "ADAPTIVE" formatting option manually.

Here are the notes from the change log:

- GV$SQL_MONITOR and GV$SQL_PLAN_MONITOR can now be customized in the
settings as table names in case you want to use your own custom monitoring repository that copies data from GV$SQL_MONITOR and GV$SQL_PLAN_MONITOR in order to keep/persist monitoring data. The tables need to have at least those columns that are used by XPLAN_ASH from the original views

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A minor update 4.01 to the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

These are the notes from the change log:

- More info for RAC Cross Instance Parallel Execution: Many sections now show a GLOBAL aggregate info in addition to instance-specific data

- The Parallel Execution Server Set detection and ASSUMED_DEGREE info now makes use of the undocumented PX_STEP_ID and PX_STEPS_ARG info (bit mask part of the PX_FLAGS column) on 11.2.0.2+

- Since version 4.0 added from 11.2.0.2 on the PX *MAX* DOP in the "SQL statement execution ASH Summary" based on the new PX_FLAGS column of ASH it makes sense to add a PX *MIN* DOP in the summary to see at one glance if different DOPs were used or not

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version of the XPLAN_ASH tool (detailed analysis of a single SQL statement execution) is available for download. The previous post includes links to video tutorials explaining what the tool is about.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

The new version comes with numerous improvements and new features. The most important ones are:

  • Real-Time SQL Monitoring info included
  • Complete coverage including recursive SQL
  • Improved performance
  • 12c compatible
  • Simplified usage

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Tool - Video Tutorial

A new major release (version 3.0) of my XPLAN_ASH tool is available for download.

You can download the latest version here.

In addition to many changes to the way the information is presented and many other smaller changes to functionality there is one major new feature: XPLAN_ASH now also supports S-ASH, the free ASH implementation.

If you run XPLAN_ASH in a S-ASH repository owner schema, it will automatically detect that and adjust accordingly.

XPLAN_ASH was tested against the latest stable version of S-ASH (2.3). There are some minor changes required to that S-ASH release in order to function properly with XPLAN_ASH. Most of them will be included in the next S-ASH release as they really are only minor and don't influence the general S-ASH functionality at all.