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Create an Oracle VM on Azure in Less than 5 Minutes

If there’s one thing I’ve been able to prove this week, it’s that even with the sweet 4G LTE, Wi-Fi setup in my RV, Montana still has the worst Wi-Fi coverage in the US.  Lucky for me, I work in the cloud and automate everything, because if there’s one thing I love about automating with scripts, is that I can build out a deployment faster and less resource intensive than anyone can from the portal.

Oracle Virtual Machines in Azure

When you build out an Azure VM, with Oracle, you’ll also need to have the supporting structure and a sufficiently sized additional disk for your database.  This can be a lot of clicks inside a portal, but from a script, a few questions and bam, you have everything you need.

Best Practices for Oracle Data Guard on Azure

I keep saying I’m going to start sharing what I’m doing in the Analytics space soon, but heck, there’s too much I need to keep adding to on the Oracle in Azure arena!

So, as most people know, I’m not a big fan of Oracle RAC, (Real Application Cluster).  My opinion was that it was often sold for use cases that it doesn’t serve, (such as HA) and the resource demands between the nodes, as well as what happens when a node is evicted to those that are left are not in the best interest for most use cases.  On the other hand, I LOVE Oracle Data Guard, active or standard, don’t matter, the product is great and it’s an awesome option for those migrating their Oracle databases to Azure VMs.

Oracle and Microsoft’s Cross-Cloud Partnership

A couple weeks back, Oracle and Microsoft announced their cross-cloud partnership.  This was wonderful news to me, as I’ve been working on numerous Oracle projects at Microsoft with Azure.

The Gist

To know that there is now a partnership between the two clouds and that there’s also a large amount of documentation about working between the two clouds is very helpful vs. the amount I’ve been working on based off just my knowledge.  Just as anyone appreciates a second set of eyes, I now have two company’s worth!

Linux Scripting, Part III

In the previous blog posts, we learned how to set up the first part of a standard shell script- how to interactively set variables, including how to pass them as part of the script execution. In this next step, we’ll use those to build out Azure resources. If you’re working on-premises, you can use this type of scripting with SQL Server 2019 Linux but will need to use CLI commands and SQLCMD. I will cover this in later posts, but honestly, the cloud makes deployment quicker for any business to get what they need deployed and with the amount of revenue riding on getting to market faster, this should be the first choice of any DBA with vision.

Linux Scripting, Part II

In Part I, we started with some scripting basics, as in, how to write a script. This included the concepts of breaking a script into sections, (introduction, body and conclusion)

For Part II, we’ll start with the BASH script “introduction”.

The introduction in a BASH script should begin the same in all scripts.

  1. Set the shell to be used for the script
  2. Set the response to failure on any steps, (exit or ignore)
  3. Add in a step for testing, but comment out or remove when in production

For our scripts, we’ll keep to the BASH format that is used by the template scripts, ensuring a repeatable and easy to identify introduction.

Dynamic Values in Linux Scripting

I do a LOT of scripting. Given the choice to click in a GUI vs. typing at the command line, I’ll choose the command line. Given the choice to type commands in repeatedly vs. scripting out a task I perform more than twice, I’ll script. Scripting effectively is an art as much as it’s a science.

My idea of science

Where a GUI can change, both in content, as well as layout, a script is less impacted by this when it is designed to dynamically work with the catalog. You have the choice to either work with the values in an array or to just pull it into a temporary file to work with as part of the script. For the example, I’ll stick with the latter to make our example easier to reproduce.

Oracle RAC vs. SQL Server AG

As I have seen the benefit for having a post on Oracle database vs. SQL Server architecture, let’s move onto the next frontier- High Availability…or what people think is high availability architecture in the two platforms.

To RAC or Not to RAC

There is a constant rumble among Oracle DBAs- either all-in for Oracle Real Application Cluster, (RAC) or a desire to use it for the tool it was technically intended for. Oracle RAC can be very enticing- complex and feature rich, its the standard for engineered systems, such as Oracle Exadata and even the Oracle Data Appliance, (ODA). Newer implementation features, such as Oracle RAC One-Node offered even greater flexibility in the design of Oracle environments, but we need to also discuss what it isn’t- Oracle RAC is not a Disaster Recovery solution.

Oracle vs. SQL Server Architecture

There are a lot of DBAs that are expected to manage both Oracle and MSSQL environments. This is only going to become more common as database platforms variations with the introduction of the cloud continue. A database is a database in our management’s world and we’re expected to understand it all.

Its not an easy topic, but I’m going to post on it, taking it step by step and hopefully the diagrams will help. Its also not an apple to apple comparison, so hopefully, but starting at the base and working my way into it with as similar as comparisons as I’m able to with features, it will make sense for those out there that need to understand it.

We have a number of customers that are migrating Oracle to Azure and many love Oracle and want to keep their Oracle database as is, just bringing their licenses over to the cloud. The importance of this is they may have Azure/SQL DBAs managing them, so I’m here to help.

Migrating DB2 Databases to Azure

Yep, still doing a lot of database migrations. Just too many people wanting to migrate their other database platforms over to Azure…

I have two customers that have DB2 databases and I know how overwhelming it can be to take on a project like this, so I thought I would go over the high level steps to this project to demonstrate it’s a lot easier than many first may believe. The SQL Server Migration Assistant is your friend and can take a lot of the hardship out of migration projects.

No Pause on the Azure Data Factory

Using only what you need in Azure is a crucial part of optimizing your environment in the cloud. You find that as attractive as Azure is for the masses, making this change to make sure what you do use is optimal will make it downright irresistible.

Many customers, as they are ramping up with Azure Data Factory, (ADF) didn’t worry too much as they built out pipelines, as they could always pause the service at the resource level.

In recent weeks this feature has been deprecated and customers may be at a loss as to how to proceed. The best part about technology is that there’s always another way to accomplish something, you just need to figure out how to do it. Lucky for us, the Azure team wouldn’t have removed an option without another way to perform the task and in fact, introduced an enhanced way to do this.