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Partitioned Bitmap Join

If you don’t want to read the story, the summary for this article is:

If you create bitmap join indexes on a partitioned table and you use partition exchanges to load data into the table then make sure you create the bitmap join indexes on the loading tables in exactly the same order as you created them on the partitioned table or the exchange will fail with the (truthful not quite complete) error: ORA-14098: index mismatch for tables in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

Subquery Effects

Towards the end of last year I used a query with a couple of “constant” subqueries as a focal point for a blog note on reading parallel execution plans. One of the comments on that note raised a question about cardinality estimates and, coincidentally, I received an email about the cost calculations for a similar query a few days later.

Unfortunately there are all sorts of anomalies, special cases, and changes that show up across versions when subqueries come into play – it’s only in recent versions of 11.2, for example, that a very simple example I’ve got of three equivalent statements that produce the same execution plan report the same costs and cardinality. (The queries are:  table with IN subquery, table with EXISTS subquery, table joined to “manually unnested” subquery – the three plans take the unnested subquery shape.)

NLS Mess

The Oracle database has all sorts of little details built into it to help it deal with multi-national companies, but since they’re not commonly used you can find all sorts of odd “buggy” bits of behaviour when you start to look closely. I have to put “buggy” in quotes because some of the reported oddities are the inevitable consequences of (for example) how multi-byte character sets have to work; but some of the oddities look as if they simply wouldn’t be there if the programmer writing the relevant bit of code had remembered that they also had to cater for some NLS feature.

ANSI bug

In almost all cases the SQL you write using the ANSI standard syntax is tranformed into a statement using Oracle’s original syntax before being optimised – and there are still odd cases where the translation is not ideal.  This can result in poor performance, it can result in wrong results. The following examples arrived in my in-tray a couple of weeks ago:

Table Expansion

I’ve often found that while I’m investigating one Oracle feature I get waylaid by noticing anomalies in other parts of the code. I was caught by one of these events a little while ago while experimenting with the new (12.1.0.2) Inmemory Columnar Store.  After reading a posting by Martin Bach I asked the question:

“If you have a partitioned table with a local index and one of the table partitions has been declared INMEMORY, would a query that could use that index be able to apply table expansion to produce a plan that did a tablescan on the in-memory partition and an indexed access path on the partitions that weren’t in-memory?”

Wrong Results

Here’s a little gem in 12c that arrived in my email a few days ago: a query where the result depends on the SQL*Plus arraysize!

The email had a short description, and a script to create a small data set that would demonstrate the problem. I’m not going to show you the query, or the result set, but here’s a sample of the output from an SQL*Plus session after creating the data. This is, by the way, on a “single-user” system – there is no way that some other session is changing the data – especially after the opening “set transaction”:

Histogram Limit

A surprising question came up on OTN a couple of days ago:

Why does a query for “column = 999999999999999999” run slower than a query for “column > 999999999999999998” (that’s 18 digit numbers, if you don’t want to count them). With the equality predicate the query is very slow, with the range-based predicate perfomance is good.

Result Cache

Yesterday I thought I’d spend half an hour before breakfast creating a little demonstration of a feature; some time about midnight I felt it was time to stop because I’d spent enough time chasing around a couple of bugs that produced wrong results in a variety of ways. Today’s short post is just little warning: be VERY careful what you do with the PL/SQL result cache – if you use the results of database queries in the cache you may end up with inconsistent results in your application. Here’s one very simple example of what can go wrong, starting with a little script:

IN/EXISTS bugs

Here’s a simple data set – I’m only interested in three of the columns in the work that follows, but it’s a data set that I use for a number of different models:

Subquery Factoring (10)

What prompted me to write my previous note about subquerying was an upgrade to 12c, and a check that a few critical queries would not do something nasty on the upgrade. As ever it’s always interesting how many little oddities you can discover while looking closely as some little detail of how the optimizer works. Here’s an oddity that came up in the course of my playing around investigation in 12.1.0.2 – first some sample data: