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Delete Costs

One of the quirky little anomalies of the optimizer is that it’s not allowed to select rows from a table after doing an index fast full scan (index_ffs) even if it is obviously the most efficient (or, perhaps, least inefficient) strategy. For example:

Delete Costs

One of the quirky little anomalies of the optimizer is that it’s not allowed to select rows from a table after doing an index fast full scan (index_ffs) even if it is obviously the most efficient (or, perhaps, least inefficient) strategy. For example:

Securefiles

A few weeks ago someone emailed me about a problem they had importing securefiles – it was very slow. Such things are never easy to address by email, of course, but there were three features to consider: (a) it was securfiles, (b) it was impdp, and (c) it was across a database link. If you read my blog regularly you’ll have seen me comment a few times that the easiest way to break Oracle is to mix a few features – so

Securefiles

A few weeks ago someone emailed me about a problem they had importing securefiles – it was very slow. Such things are never easy to address by email, of course, but there were three features to consider: (a) it was securfiles, (b) it was impdp, and (c) it was across a database link. If you read my blog regularly you’ll have seen me comment a few times that the easiest way to break Oracle is to mix a few features – so

Ignoring Hints

Does Oracle ignore hints – not if you use them correctly, and sometimes it doesn’t ignore them even when you use them incorrectly!

Here’s an example that I’ve run on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.1


create table t1
as
with generator as (
	select	--+ materialize
		rownum id
	from dual
	connect by
		level <= 1e4
)
select
	rownum			id,
	rownum			n1,
	rpad('x',100)		padding
from
	generator	v1
;

begin
	dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
		ownname		 => user,
		tabname		 =>'T1',
		method_opt	 => 'for all columns size 1'
	);
end;
/

create index t1_i1 on t1(id);
alter index t1_i1 unusable;

select n1 from t1 where id = 15;
select /*+ index(t1 (id)) */ n1 from t1 where id = 15;

Any guesses about the output from the last 4 statements ?

Subquery with OR

Prompted by a pingback on this post, followed in very short order by a related question (with a most gratifying result) on Oracle-L, I decided to write up a note about another little optimizer enhancement that appeared in 12c. Here’s a query that differs slightly from the query in the original article:

Costing Bug

It’s amazing how you can find little bugs (or anomalies) as soon as you start to look closely at how things work in Oracle. I started to write an article for All Things Oracle last night about execution plans with subqueries, so wrote a little script to generate some sample data, set up the first sample query, checked the execution plan, and stopped because the final cost didn’t make sense. Before going on I should point out that this probably doesn’t matter and probably wouldn’t cause a change in the execution plan if the calculation were corrected – but it is just an interesting indication of the odd things that can happen when sections of modular code are combined in an open-ended way. Here’s the query (running on 11.2.0.4) with execution plan:

Bigfiles

It’s always the combinations that catch you out.

Bigfile tablespaces have their uses – especially in big systems

Materialized views have their users – especially in big systems

There’s absolutely no reason why the two technologies should interfere with each other … until you find a bug !

Running an example, stripped to the bare minimum, and doing a couple of things that I personally don’t like doing, on 11.2.0.4:

Coincindences

I had another of those odd timing events today that make me think that Larry Ellison has access to a time machine. I found (yet another example of a) bug that had been reported on MoS just a few days before it appeared on an instance I was running. How is it possible that someone keeps doing things that I’m doing, but just a few days before I do them !

For no good reason I happened to browse through a load of background trace files on an 11.2.0.4 instance and found the following in an “m000″ file:

Cache anomaly

Just a quick heads-up for anyone who likes to play around with the Keep and Recycle caches.

In 11g Oracle introduced the option for serial direct path reads for tablescans on tables that was sufficiently large – which meant more than the small_table_threshold – provided the table wasn’t already sufficient well cached.  (The rules mean that the choice of mechanism can appear to be a little random in the production environment for tables that are near the threshold size – but if you try testing by doing “alter system flush buffer_cache” you find that you always get direct path reads in testing.)