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Execution plans

min/max Upgrade

A question came up on the OTN database forum a little while ago about a very simple query that was taking different execution paths on two databases with the same table and index definitions and similar data. In one database the plan used the “index full scan (min/max)” operation while the other database used a brute force “index fast full scan” operation.

Join Elimination

A question has just appeared on OTN describing a problem where code that works in 11g doesn’t work in 12c (exact versions not specified). The code in question is a C-based wrapper for some SQL, and the problem is a buffer overflow problem. The query supplied is as follows:


select T1.C1 from T1, T2 where T1.C1 = T2.D1;

The problem is that this works in 11g where the receiving (C) variable is declared as

char myBuffer [31];

but it doesn’t work in 12c unless the receiving variable is declared as:

I don’t know (yet)

Here’s a question that came to mind while reading a recent question on the OTN database forum. It’s a question to which I don’t know the answer and, at present, I don’t really want to bother modelling at present – although if I were on a customer site and this looked like a likely explanation for a performance anomaly it’s the sort of thing I would create a model for.

Cost is Time (again)

The hoary old question about lower cost queries running faster or slower that higher cost queries has appeared once again on the OTN database forum. It’s one I’ve addressed numerous times in the past – including on this blog – but the Internet being what it is the signal keeps getting swamped by the noise. This time around a couple of “new” thoughts crossed my mind when reading the question.

There is a Time column on the standard forms of the execution plan output, and the description of this column is available in the manuals and has been for years (here’s a definition from v$sql_plan from 10gR2, for example):

Band Join 12c

One of the optimizer enhancements that appeared in 12.2 for SQL is the “band join”. that makes certain types of merge join much more  efficient.  Consider the following query (I’ll supply the SQL to create the demonstration at the end of the posting) which joins two tables of 10,000 rows each using a “between” predicate on a column which (just to make it easy to understand the size of the result set)  happens to be unique with sequential values though there’s no index or constraint in place:

Join Elimination 12.2

From time to time someone comes up with the question about whether or not the order of tables in the from clause of a SQL statement should make a difference to execution plans and performance. Broadly speaking the answer is no, although there are a couple of boundary cases were a difference can appear unexpectedly.

Filter Subquery

There’s a current thread on the OTN database forum showing an execution plan with a slightly unusual feature. It looks like this:

Fixed Stats

There are quite a lot of systems around the world that aren’t using the AWR (automatic workload repository) and ASH (active session history) tools to help them with trouble shooting because of the licensing requirement – so I’m still finding plenty of sites that are using Statspack and I recently came across a little oddity at one of these sites that I hadn’t noticed before: one of the Statspack snapshot statements was appearing fairly regularly in the Statspack report under the “SQL Ordered by Elapsed Time” section – even when the application had been rather busy and had generated lots of other work that was being reported. It was the following statement – the collection of file-level statistics:

IOT limitation

In the right circumstances Index Organized Tables (IOTs) give us tremendous benefits – provided you use them in the ideal fashion. Like so many features in Oracle, though, you often have to compromise between the benefit you really need and the cost of the side effect that a feature produces.

Conditional SQL- 6

An odd little anomaly showed up on the OTN database forum a few days ago where a query involving a table covered by Oracle Label Security (OLS) seemed to wrap itself into a non-mergeable view when written using traditional Oracle SQL, but allowed for view-merging when accessed through ANSI standard SQL. I don’t know why there’s a difference but it did prompt a thought about non-mergeable views and what I’ve previously called “conditional SQL” – namely SQL which holds a predicate that should have been tested in the client code and not passed to the database engine.

The thought was this – could the database engine decide to do a lot of redundant work if you stuck a silly predicate inside a non-mergeable view: the answer turns out to be yes. Here’s a demonstration I’ve run on 11g and 12c: