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Infrastructure

IOT limitation

In the right circumstances Index Organized Tables (IOTs) give us tremendous benefits – provided you use them in the ideal fashion. Like so many features in Oracle, though, you often have to compromise between the benefit you really need and the cost of the side effect that a feature produces.

Securefile space

Here’s a little script I hacked together a couple of years ago from a clone of a script I’d been using for checking space usage in the older types of segments. Oracle Corp. eventually put together a routine to peer inside securefile LOBs:

Basicfile LOBs 6

One of the nice things about declaring your (basicfile) LOBs as “enable storage in row” is that the block addresses of the first 12 chunks will be listed in the row and won’t use the LOB index, so if your LOBs are larger than 3960 bytes but otherwise rather small the LOB index will hold only the timestamp entries for deleted LOBs. This makes it just a little easier to pick out the information you need when things behave strangely, so in this installment of my series I’m going to take about an example with with storage enabled in row.

Basicfile LOBS 5

At the end of the last installment we had seen a test case that caused Oracle to add a couple of redundant new extents to a LOB segment after one process deleted 3,000 LOBs and another four concurrent processes inserted 750 LOBs each a few minutes later (after the undo retention period had elapsed). To add confusion the LOBINDEX seemed to show that all the “reusable” chunks had been removed from the index which suggests that they should have been re-used. Our LOB segment started at 8,192 blocks, is currently at 8,576 blocks and is only using 8,000 of them.

How will things look if I now connect a new session (which might be associated with a different freepool), delete the oldest 3,000 LOBs, wait a little while, then get my original four sessions to do their concurrent inserts again ? And what will things look like after I’ve repeated this cycle several times ?

Space Usage

Here’s a simple script that I’ve used for many years to check space usage inside segments.  The comment about freelist groups may be out of date  – I’ve not had to worry about that for a very long time. There is a separate script for securefile lobs.

Basicfile LOBs 4

At the end of the previous installment we saw that a single big batch delete would (apparently) attach all the “reusable” chunks into a single freepool, and asked the questions:

  • Why would the Oracle developer think that this use of one freepool is a good idea ?
  • Why might it be a bad idea ?
  • What happens when we start inserting more data ?

(Okay, I’ll admit it, the third question is a clue about the answer to the second question.)

Basicfile LOBS 3

In the previous article in this mini-series I described how the option for setting freepools N when defining Basicfile LOBs was a feature aimed at giving you improved concurrency for inserts and deletes that worked by splitting the LOBINDEX into 2N sections: N sections to index the current LOB chunks by LOB id, alternating with N sections to map the reusable LOB chunks by deletion time.

In this article we’ll look a little further into the lifecycle of the LOB segment but before getting into the details I’ll just throw out a couple of consequences of the basic behaviour of LOBs that might let you pick the best match for the workload you have to deal with.

Basicfile LOBs 2

There are probably quite a lot of people still using Basicfile LOBs, although Oracle Corp. would like everyone to migrate to the (now default) Securefile LOBs. If you’re on Basicfile, though, and don’t want (or aren’t allowed) to change just yet here are a few notes that may help you understand some of the odd performance and storage effects.

Basicfile LOBs 1

I got a call to a look at a performance problem involving LOBs a little while ago. The problem was with an overnight batch that had about 40 sessions inserting small LOBs (12KB to 22KB) concurrently, for a total of anything between 100,000 and 1,000,000 LOBs per night. You can appreciate that this would eventually become a very large LOB segment – so before the batch started all LOBs older than one month were deleted.

The LOB column had the following (camouflaged) declaration:

Union All MV

In an article I wrote last week about Bloom filters disappearing as you changed a SELECT to a (conventional) INSERT/SELECT I suggested using the subquery_pruning() hint to make the optimizer fall back to an older strategy of partition pruning. My example showed this working with a range partitioned table but one of the readers reported a problem when trying to apply the strategy to a composite range/hash partitioned table and followed this up with an execution plan of a select statement with a Bloom filter where the subquery_pruning() hint didn’t introduced subquery pruning when the select was used for an insert.