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IO

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the physical read and use the block from the cache, until the block is evicted from the cache. The second choice is what is commonly referred to as ‘direct path read’, which places the blocks physically read into the process’ PGA, which means the read blocks are stored for only a short duration and is not shared with other processes.

Oracle 12c in-memory option and IO

This article is about the Oracle 12c in-memory option, and specifically looks at how the background worker processes do IO to populate the in-memory column store.

Hardware: Apple Macbook with VMWare Fusion 7.1.3.
Operating system: Oracle Linux 6.7, kernel: 3.8.13-118.el6uek.x86_64.
Database version: Oracle 12.1.0.2
Patch: opatch lspatches
19392604;OCW PATCH SET UPDATE : 12.1.0.2.1 (19392604)
19303936;Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.1 (19303936)

But first things first, let’s setup the in-memory option first with a test table. The first thing to consider is to create the in-memory area to store the objects. I only want a single table stored in the in-memory area, so I can very simply look at the size of object:

Direct path and buffered reads again: compressed tables.

In the previous post on the decision between buffered and direct path reads I showed the decision is depended on the version. Up to and including version 11.2.0.2 the size of a segment needs to be five times small table threshold in order to be considered for direct path reads, and starting from 11.2.0.3 the database starts considering direct path reads starting from small table threshold. The lower limit just discussed is small table threshold or five times small table threshold with lower versions, upper limit is called “very large object threshold” (VLOT) and is five times the size of the buffercache, which is the threshold after which a table scan always is going via direct path.

Physical IO on Linux

I posted a fair amount of stuff on how Oracle is generating IOs, and especially large IOs, meaning more than one Oracle block, so > 8KB. This is typically what is happening when the Oracle database is executing a row source which does a full segment scan. Let’s start off with a quiz: what you think Oracle is the maximum IO size the Oracle engine is capable of requesting of the Operating System (so the IO size as can be seen at the SCI (system call interface) layer? If you made up your answer, remember it, and read on!

The real intention of this blogpost is to describe what is going on in the Oracle database kernel, but also what is being done in the Linux kernel. Being a performance specialised Oracle DBA means you have to understand what the operating system does. I often see that it’s of the utmost importance to understand how an IO ends up as a request at the NAS or SAN head, so you understand what a storage admin is talking about.

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Linux strace doesn’t lie after all.

strace is a linux utility to profile system calls. Using strace you can see the system calls that a process executes, in order to investigate the inner working or performance. In my presentation about multiblock reads I put the text ‘strace lies’. This is NOT correct. My current understanding is that strace does show every system call made by an executable. So…why did I make that statement? (editorial note: this article dives into the inner working of Linux AIO)

Exadata: disk level statistics

This is the fourth post on a serie of postings on how to get measurements out of the cell server, which is the storage layer of the Oracle Exadata database machine. Up until now, I have looked at the measurement of the kind of IOs Exadata receives, the latencies of the IOs as as done by the cell server, and the mechanism Exadata uses to overcome overloaded CPUs on the cell layer.

Exadata: measuring IO latencies experienced by the cell server

Exadata is about doing IO. I think if there’s one thing people know about Exadata, that’s it. Exadata brings (part of the) processing potentially closer to the storage media, which will be rotating disks for most (Exadata) users, and optionally can be flash.

Exadata: what kind of IO requests has a cell been receiving?

When you are administering an Exadata or more Exadata’s, you probably have multiple databases running on different database or “computing” nodes. In order to understand what kind of IO you are doing, you can look inside the statistics of your database, and look in the data dictionary what that instance or instances (in case of RAC) have been doing. When using Exadata there is a near 100% chance you are using either normal redundancy or high redundancy, of which most people know the impact of the “write amplification” of both normal and high redundancy of ASM (the write statistics in the Oracle data dictionary do not reflect the additional writes needed to satisfy normal (#IO times 2) or high (#IO times 3) redundancy). This means there might be difference in IOs between what you measure or think for your database is doing, and actually is done at the storage level.

Oracle I/O latency monitoring


stopwatchOne thing that I have found sorely missing in the performance pages of Enterprise Manager is latency values for various types of I/O. The performance page or top activity may show high I/O waits but it won’t indicated if the latency of I/O is unusually high or not. Thus I put together a shell script that shows latency for the main I/O waits