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IORM

IO Resource Manager for Pluggable Databases in Exadata

Another interesting topic that goes over and above the CDB Resource Manager Plans I described earlier this week is the implementation of IORM Plans for Pluggable Databases. Pluggable Databases are an interesting object for studies, and I like to research things. When 12c came out there was no support for offloading initially, it is required that you are on cell software 12.1.x.x.x for full 12c support on Exadata. One aspect I was particularly interested in were PDBs and IORM. Limiting CPU on a PDB basis is already a cool thing, but in a hugely consolidated environment it does make sense to limit I/O based on a consumer group. Another one of the perks of working on Exadata :)

Intra-Database IORM in action

I have been teaching the Enkitec Exadata Administration Class this week and made an interesting observation I thought was worth sharing with regards to IO Resource Management on Exadata.

I have created a Database Resource Manager (DBRM) Plan that specifically puts a resource consumer group to a disadvantage. Actually, quite severely so but the following shouldn’t be a realistic example in the first place: I wanted to prove a point. Hang-on I hear you say: you created a DBRM plan-the post has IORM in the subject though: what gives? Please allow me to explain.

Exadata offers 3 different ways to implement IORM to the keen engineer:

The Oracle Exadata IO Resource Manager Limit Clause, part 2

In my previous post I described how the IO resource manager (IORM) in the exadata storage can be used both to guarantee a minimum amount of IO a database can get (which is what is covered in most material available), but also to set a maximum amount of IO. This is what Oracle calls an inter-database resource manager plan. This is set and configured at the cell level using the cellcli with ‘alter iormplan dbplan’.

The Oracle Exadata IO Resource Manager Limit Clause

The Exadata IO Resource Manager (IORM) is a fundamental piece of the exadata database machine since the beginning. The function of the IORM is to guarantee a database and/or category (set via the database resource manager) gets the share of IO as defined in the resource plan at each storage server. The “share” here means the minimal amount of IO. This is widely known and documented in the Exadata documentation. Having a minimal amount of IO means you can guarantee a service level agreement (SLA).

But what if you want to define the maximal amount of IO a database may get? The case of a maximal amount of IO a database can get is that you can use a database on Exadata, and do not (or very limited) change the performance once more databases get onto the same database machine. So instead of having the minimal amount of IO a database must get guaranteed (which is what is documented in the exadata documentation), having a limit on the maximal amount a database can get?