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Pressure Stall Information on Autonomous Linux

By Franck Pachot

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The Linux metrics that are usually considered for performance monitoring and troubleshooting have many drawbacks and frequent misinterpretations. The recent kernels provide PSI (Pressure Stall Information) which is not enabled by default in Oracle Linux “unbreakable” kernel. However, the kernel is compiled with it. Here is how to enabled it in a newly create Autonomous Linux instance (the Oracle Cloud Linux ,based on OEL 7.9, with no-downtime patching)

Check PSI availability


[opc@sillymetrics ~]$ tail /proc/pressure/*

==> /proc/pressure/cpu  /proc/pressure/io  /proc/pressure/memory <==
tail: error reading ‘/proc/pressure/memory’: Operation not supported

PSI (Pressure Stall Information) is not available

Oracle database processes and waiting long in the supermarket

Hopefully I got your interest by the weird name of this blogpost. This blogpost is about sensible usage of an Oracle database. Probably, there are a lot of blog posts like this, but I need to get this off my chest.

A quote any starwars fan would recognise is ‘I sense a disturbance in the force’. I do, and I have felt it for a long time. This disturbance is the usage of the number of connections for a database. Because of my profession, this is the oracle database, but this really applies to the server-side of any client/server server processor running on at least (but probably not limited to) intel Xeon processors.

The disturbance is the oversubscription or sometimes even excessive oversubscription of database connections from application servers, or any other means of database processes that acts as clients. This means this does not exclude parallel query processes, in other words: this applies to parallel query processes too.

Video : Convert CentOS to Oracle Linux

In today’s video we’ll demonstrate how to convert a CentOS installation to an Oracle Linux installation.

The video is based on this post.

The star of today’s video is Dan Norris, in a clip from a previous OpenWorld, which seems like a long distant memory now.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. I know I said there would be no more videos this year, but this was very much “of the moment”, so I thought it was worth doing.

Switching from CentOS 8 to Oracle Linux 8 (OL8)

If you’re a CentOS user, you’ve probably already seen Red Hat are ditching CentOS, and CentOS 8 will be the first casualty. At the time of writing Red Hat haven’t released a clear plan for what CentOS users should do. Neither Fedora or CentOS Stream are viable options for people looking for long term stability. There’s a suggestion that cut price RHEL licenses may be available in future, but all we know at this point is CentOS is on a road to nowhere.

Device name persistence in the cloud: OCI

Device name persistence is an important concept for everyone deploying the Oracle database. In this little series I’ll show how you can achieve device name persistence with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) and block storage. I am hoping to share future parts for Azure and AWS.

In the example I’m going to prepare a cloud VM for the installation of Oracle Grid Infrastructure 19.9.0. To do so I have created a number of block devices in addition to the boot volume:

  • One block volume to contain the Oracle binaries
  • Two block volumes to be used as +DATA
  • Two more block volumes for +RECO

This is going to be a playground environment, the block volume size is unrealistically small. You will certainly need larger block devices for a production environment. Additionally there is most likely a cost associated with creating these resources, be careful!

Handling kernel upgrades with Ansible prior to an Oracle installation

As part of the process of setting up VMs in the cloud for use with the Oracle database it is frequently necessary to update the systems to the latest and greatest, and hopefully more secure packages before the Oracle installation can begin. In a similar way I regularly upgrade the (cloud-vendor provided) base image when building a custom image using Packer. This demands for an automated process in my opinion, and Ansible is the right tool for me.

I may have mentioned once or twice that a Spacewalk powered (or equivalent) local repository is best for consistency. You may want to consider using it to ensure all systems are upgraded to the same packages. Applying the same package updates in production as you did in test (after successful regression testing of course) makes testing in lower-tier environments so much more meaningful ;)

About the oracle database and compiling and linking.

This blogpost is about how the oracle database executable created or changed during installation and patching. I take linux for the examples, because that is the version that I am almost uniquely working with. I think the linux operating is where the vast majority of linux installations are installed on, and therefore an explanation with linux is helpful to most of the people.

The first thing to understand is the oracle executable is a dynamically linked executable. This is easy to see when you execute the ‘ldd’ utility against the oracle executable:

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: using Network Security Groups and the caveat with the subnet’s default security list

This is going to be one of these posts I’m mainly writing to myself, in the hope that a) I don’t forget about that topic too soon and b) someone might have the same question and doesn’t want to spin up an environment to find out.

Broadly speaking Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (and some other cloud providers) give you 2 different means of securing the Virtual Cloud Network at the VCN level:

Upgrading oraclelinux-release-el7 might trigger an upgrade to UEK Release 6

While building a demo environment for an upcoming presentation I noticed an upgrade from UEK 5 to UEK 6 on my Oracle Linux 7 VM. As it turned out, the kernel change has been triggered by an upgrade of oraclelinux-release-el7 RPM. I am a great fan of Oracle’s UEK and the team behind it, so this is a welcome change for me. It might however meet you unprepared, which is why I put this little article together.

Whether or not the contents of my article applies to you depends on your yum configuration, and the source of your packages.

Ingest format performance with UUID using CockroachDB

Recently, I have been working with customers that have been concerned about the performance of various UUID formats. Other products have various performance characteristics for inserting, generating and presenting UUID data.

For this blog, I ran a quick series of tests using jmeter insert data along with some simple SQL tests to generate UUID values. Hopefully, this will be helpful to better your understanding of UUID with CockroachDB.

UUID formats

Cockroach DB has four different ways data can be formatted for use with the UUID data type.

String format
'63616665-6630-3064-6465-616462656564'

Curly Brace format
'{63616665-6630-3064-6465-616462656564}'