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OBUG Tech Days Belgium 2019 – Antwerp – 7/8-FEB-2019

Agenda: https://www.techdaysbelgium.be/?page_id=507

Dates: February 7 and 8, 2019

Location: http://cinemacartoons.be in Antwerp, Belgium

More information soon.

For people from the netherlands: this is easy reachable by car or by train! This is a chance to attend a conference and meet up with a lot of well-known speakers in the Oracle database area without too extensive travelling.

Bootstrapping a VM image in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure using cloud-init

At the time of writing Oracle’s Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offers 2 ways to connect block storage to virtual machines: paravirtualised and via iSCSI. There are important differences between the two so please read the documentation to understand all the implications. I need all the performance I can get with my systems so I’m going with iSCSI.

Enhanced “validate” commands in Oracle’s Data Guard Broker 18c

If you are using an Oracle Database Enterprise Edition chances are that there is at least one environment in your estate making use of Data Guard. And if you are using Data Guard, why not use the broker? I have been using Data Guard broker for a long time now, and it has definitely improved a lot over the first releases, back in the day. I like it so much these days that I feel hard done by if I can’t make use of it. This is of course a matter of personal preference, and I might be exaggerating a little :)

One of the nice additions to the broker in Oracle 12.1 was the ability to validate a database before a role change. This is documented in the Data Guard broker documentation. I certainly don’t solely rely on the output of the command, I have my own checks I’m running that go over and above what a validate can do.

Log in to Ubuntu VMs in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

When I learned that Oracle was providing Ubuntu images in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) I was a bit surprised at first. After all, Oracle provides a great Enterprise Linux distribution in the form of Oracle Linux. As a Ubuntu fan I do of course appreciate the addition of Ubuntu to the list of supported distributions. In fact it doesn’t end there, have a look at the complete list of Oracle provided images to see what’s available.

Trying Ubuntu LTS

I wanted to give Ubuntu a spin on OCI and decided to start a small VM using the 16.04 LTS image. I have been using this release quite heavily in the past and have yet to make the transition to 18.04. Starting the 16.04 VM up was easily done using my terraform script. Immediately after the terraform prompt returned I faced a slight issue: I couldn’t log in:

Terraforming the Oracle Cloud: choosing and using an image family

For a few times now I have presented about “cloud deployments done the cloud way”, sharing lessons learned in the changing world I find myself in. It’s a lot of fun and so far I have been far too busy to blog about things I learned by trial and error. Working with Terraform turned out to be a very good source for blog posts, I’ll put a few of these up in the hope of saving you a few minutes.

This blog post is all about creating Ubuntu images in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) using terraform. The technique is equally applicable for other Linux image types though. In case you find this post later using a search engine, here is some version information that might put everything into context:

opatch investigations

This blogpost is about opatch and how to obtain information about the current oracle home(s), and how to obtain information about the patches to be applied.

Patches that can be applied using opatch are provided by oracle as zip files which have the following naming convention:
p[patchnumber]_[baseversion]_[platform]-[architecture].zip. The patch normally contains an XML file called ‘PatchSearch.xml’ and a directory with the patch number. Inside the patch number directory there is a README.txt which is lame, because it says ‘Refer to README.html’, and a README.html that contains the readme information that is also visible when the [README] button for this patch is selected in MOS.

Ansible tips’n’tricks: executing related tasks together

I have recently written an ansible playbook to apply one-off patches to an Oracle Home. While doing this, I hit a little snag that needed ironing out. Before continuing this post, it’s worth pointing out that I’m on:

$ ansible --version
ansible 2.6.5

And it’s Ansible on Fedora.

Most likely the wrong way to do this …

So after a little bit of coding my initial attempt looked similar to this:

Using colplot to visualise performance data

Back in 2011 I wrote a blog post about colplot but at that time focused on running the plot engine backed by a web server. However some people might not want to take this approach, and thinking about security it might not be the best idea in the world anyway. A port that isn’t opened can’t be scanned for vulnerabilities…

So what is colplot anyway? And why this follow-up to a 7 year old post?

Running orachk as part of TFA with support tools bundle

I have previously written a number of posts about OSWatcher integration in Tracefile Analyzer (TFA) w/support tools bundle (available from My Oracle Support Document ID 1513912.1). Thus far I have neglected another useful tool available to administrators in the same package: orachk.

Summary of the environment

My lab system used for this post uses Oracle Restart 12.1.0.2 on top of Oracle Linux 7.4. I installed TFA 18.3 to /opt/tfa. If memory serves me right, TFA isn’t automatically deployed with Oracle Restart 12.1 as it now is with 12.2 and later.

[oracle@server1 ~]$ /opt/tfa/bin/tfactl print version
TFA Version : 18.3.3.0.0

A quick check using tfactl toolstatus reveals that orachk is indeed present:

Oracle wait event ‘TCP Socket (KGAS)’

I was asked some time ago what the Oracle database event ‘TCP socket (KGAS)’ means. This blogpost is a deep dive into what this event times in Oracle database 12.1.0.2.180717.

This event is not normally seen, only when TCP connections are initiated from the database using packages like UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP and the one used in this article, UTL_HTTP.

A very basic explanation is this event times the time that a database foreground session spends on TCP connection management and communicating over TCP, excluding client and database link (sqlnet) networking. If you trace the system calls, you see that mostly that is working with a (network) socket. Part of the code in the oracle database that is managing that, sits in the kernel code layer kgas, kernel generic (of which I am quite sure, and then my guess:) asynchronous services, which explains the naming of the event.