Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

linux

A look into oracle redo, part 9: commit

The previous blogpost talked about a simple insert, this blogpost investigates what happens when the DML is committed. Of course this is done with regular commit settings, which means means they are not touched, which means commit_logging is set to immediate and commit_wait is set to wait as far as I know. The documentation says there is no default value, and the settings are empty in all parameter views. In my humble opinion, if you must change the commit settings in order to make your application perform usable with the database, something is severely wrong somewhere.

This blogpost works best if you thoroughly gone through the previous post. I admit it’s a bit dry and theoretical, but you will appreciate the knowledge which you gained there, because it directly applies to a commit.

First let’s look at the flow of functions for the commit:

A look into oracle redo, part 8: generate redo

This blogpost looks at the very start of oracle redo: the generation of it. In order to do that, I start off with a very simple table, and look at the redo generation part. I guess the regular readers of this blogpost series understand that redo generation is closely connected with making changes made to blocks. This post therefore is not only about redo generation, but also about how the technical implementation of block changes.

I created a simple table (create table test (f1 varchar2(10)) with no index to make the execution as simple as possible, and simply insert rows (insert into test values (‘a’)). It could be argued that not having an index makes it not the most real life scenario, and this might be right. However, the goal here is to make the execution as simple as possible.

I then looked at the execution of the SQL, and created an overview of the relevant functions that are executed in my session:

A look into oracle redo, part 7: adaptive log file sync

This is the seventh part of a blog series about oracle redo.

Adaptive log file sync is a feature that probably came with Oracle version 11.2. Probably means I looked at the undocumented parameters of Oracle version 11.1 and do not see any of the ‘_adaptive_log_file_sync*’ parameters. It was actually turned off by default with versions 11.2.0.1 and 11.2.0.2, and was turned on by default since version 11.2.0.3.

Linux timing and scheduling granularity

During investigating how Oracle works with regards to waiting, I discovered an oddity. I was researching for my redo blog posts, and found that in a certain case, Oracle uses the ‘nanosleep’ system call. As the name of this system call suggests, this call allows you to let a process sleep with nanosecond precision.

The oddity that I found, was the following:

Where in the World Has Goth Geek Girl Been

I’m on track to fly home tomorrow, March 11th after nine days and three events.  I’m pretty exhausted and just ready to go home and catch up on some sleep…:)

I started out last weekend in Victoria BC and was thrilled to be on this emerald island of the Pacific Northwest.  British Columbia is gorgeous as it is, but Victoria is a special place that quickly became one of my favorite places in the world.

A look into Oracle redo, part 6: oracle post-wait commit and the on disk SCN

This is the sixth part in a blog series about Oracle database redo. The previous posts provided information about the log writer writing, this post is about the process that is waiting after issuing commit for the log writer to write it’s redo from the public redo strand. When the database is using post/wait for process commits, the committing process follows the following (simplified) procedure:

Can You DIG It?

As I dig deeper into Linux for the SQL Server DBAs and for Oracle HotSos, I’m digging into DIG.  Yeah, I went there with that first sentence….

A look into Oracle redo, part 5: the log writer writing

This the the fifth blog in a series of blogposts about Oracle database redo. The previous blog looked into the ‘null write’ (kcrfw_do_null_write actually) function inside kcrfw_redo_write_driver, which does housekeeping like updating SCNs and posting processes if needed, this blog looks into what happens when the log writer is actually posted by a process or if public redo strand buffers have been written into. In part 3 of this blog series (the log writer working cycle) it can be seen that when a session posts the log writer, it returns from the semaphore related functions, and calls ‘kcrfw_redo_write_driver’ directly, which otherwise is called inside ksbcti.

Inside the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function, the first thing of interest is executed only when the logwriter is posted, and the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function is called directly after returning from ksarcv and ksl_exit_main_loop_wait:

A look into into Oracle redo, part 4: the log writer null write

This is the fourth blogpost on a series of blogposts about how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous blogpost talked about the work cycle of the log writer: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-3-the-log-writer-work-cycle-overview/. This posts is looking into the execution of the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function executed in the ksbcti.

You may still need gcc when patching Oracle Database 12.2

I have previously written about changes in the Oracle 12.2 preinstall RPM and how gcc is no longer part of the dependencies list. As was pointed out to me, this shouldn’t be necessary anymore, according to the 12.2 Linux Database Installation Guide. Check the blue note for a statement indicating that gcc and gcc-c++ aren’t needed for Grid Infrastructure, nor for the RDBMS software.

I have applied patch 27100009 (January 2018 Release Update 12.2.0.1.180116) on my 2 node RAC system in the lab, and found out that this is partially true :) You may or may not encounter this issue in your environment, see below.