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ODTUG

ODTUG’s KSCOPE 2nd Annual Geekathon

After returning from KSCOPE two weeks ago, I was again approached to be a judge this year on the Geekathon 2017.

User Group Boards, Voting, Oh Yeah and ODTUG

I think we’ve just about all heard enough about voting this election year, but I want to discuss a slightly different angle and that’s when it comes to user groups.  As most people know, I’m pretty passionate about everyone contributing time to your local and national user groups.

Advert: ODTUG Webcast – “Thinking Clearly about XML”

I will make an first time attempt tomorrow to do a webcast for ODTUG in the US about how to start with XML in the Oracle database kind of topics. The subject was initially inspired by Cary Millsap’s great whitepaper, “Thinking Clearly About Performance”, that is, my attempt of doing an OakTalk during UKOUG 2011.

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Using Agile Practices to Create an Agile Presentation

What’s the best way to make a presentation on Agile practices? Practice Agile practices.

You could write a presentation “big bang” style, delivering version 1.0 in front of your big audience of 200+ people at Kscope 2011 before anybody has seen it. Of course, if you do it that way, you build a lot of risk into your product. But what else can you do?

You can execute the Agile practices of releasing early and often, allowing the reception of your product to guide its design. Whenever you find an aspect of your product that doesn’t get the enthusiastic reception you had hoped for, you fix it for the next release.

Why KScope?

Early this year, my friend Mike Riley from ODTUG asked me to write a little essay in response to the question, “Why Kscope?” that he could post on the ODTUG blog. He agreed that cross-posting would help the group reach more people, so I’ve reproduced my response to that question here. I’ll hope to see you at Kscope11 in Long Beach June 26–30. If you develop applications for Oracle systems, you need to be there.

MR: Why KScope?

ODTUG KScope Preview 2011

Ook dit jaar, namelijk op dinsdag 14 Juni, organiseert AMIS de ODTUG Preview. Het jaarlijkse congres van de ODTUG, de Oracle Development Tools Users Group, vind dit jaar plaats in Longbeach, California van 26 tot en met 30 juni. Het is niet voor iedereen weggelegd om daar naar toe te gaan. AMIS biedt, alweer voor het vijfde achtereenvolgende jaar, aan geïnteresseerden de kans om een selectie van de presentaties die daar te zien zijn bij te wonen. Een aantal Europese sprekers zal tijdens de AMIS ODTUG preview presentatie laten zien die ook in de Verenigde Staten worden gehouden.

Tijdens de AMIS ODTUG Preview zullen er drie keer drie parallelle sessies worden gehouden met verschillende onderwerpen zoals APEX, database development, ADF, JHeadstart en SOA.

Programma:

Tijd Track 1 Track 2 Track 3
16:30 Welkom en Registratie
17:00 XFILES, the APEX 4 Version: The Truth is in There…
Marco Gralike & Roel Hartman
ADF Developers – Make the Database Work for You

Lucas Jellema

Pipelined Table Functions

Patrick Barel

18:00 Dinner
19:00 APEX Face/Off – Designing a GUI with APEX Templates and Themes

Christian Rokitta

BPMN: The New Silver Bullet?

Lonneke Dikmans

Oracle JHeadstart: Superior Productivity in Developing Best-practice ADF Web Applications

Steven Davelaar

20:15 Who’s Afraid of Analytic Functions?

Alex Nuijten

Overview of Eventing in Oracle SOA Suite 11g

Ronald van Luttikhuizen

…and Thus Your Forms ‘Automagically’ Disappeared

Luc Bors

Dit evenement is met name bedoeld voor ontwikkelaars.m Uiteraard zijn er aan dit event geen kosten verbonden, maar het aantal plaatsen voor dit evenement is beperkt, wacht niet te lang. Vol is vol.

Inschrijven kan binnenkort op www.amis.nl

Agile is Not a Dirty Word

While I was writing Brown Noise in Written Language, Part 2, twice I came across the word “agile.” First, the word “agility” was in the original sentence that I was criticizing. Joel Garry picked up on it and described it as “a code word for ‘sloppy programming.’” Second, if you read my final paragraph, you might have noticed that I used the term “waterfall” to describe one method for producing bad writing. Waterfall is a reliable method for producing bad computer software too, in my experience, and for exactly the same reason. Whenever I disparage “waterfall,” I’m usually thinking fondly of “agile,” which I consider to be “waterfall’s” opposite.

Starting a Holiday (/Presentation) at #ODTUG

Time flies. Had a great weekend organizing an AMIS Query, an internal course with Doug Burns, looking at soccer games with Doug and Jacco and now already posting from a Marriott hotel room in Washington DC for some activities during #ODTUG

room / meanings

Its still a bit “quiet” (tons of elderly citizen though) in the Marriott hotel regarding conference meet-ups and/or other things, but met last night with Stanley, Debra, Alex, David (Mr. aPex) and for the first time with Sheeri (Kritzer Cabral) and her husband. Forgot his name (after 2 Guinness and pushing 36 hours “to get into the timezone”) but, man, can he draw cool “caricatures“. He had his own caricature book with him reflecting pictures of Magicians during a “Magicians Conference”, all signed by them and/or commented on. Great book/sketches and had a good laugh on how modern “Magicians” are nowadays that they have their annual conference as well…

An Essay on Science

Richard Feynman defined science as "the belief in the ignorance of experts." Science begins by questioning established ideas. ...Even those ideas promoted by so-called experts.

The value of science that's obvious to everybody is the chance you might discover some valuable truth that nobody else has discovered before. That's the glamorous idea that might motivate you to begin the hard work that science sometimes requires. Science is also valuable to you when you learn that an established idea, no matter how much you may not like it, really is true after all. That second value of science is not as glamorous, but it's just as important. My little prayer with respect to that possibility is, "If an idea I believe is wrong, please let me find out before anybody else does."

Everyone can do science. Not just "scientists"; all of us. But you need to do science "right," or it's not science. Do it right, and you accumulate a little bit of truth. Do it wrong, and and you've wasted your time, or worse, you've doomed yourself to waste more of your time in the future, too.

The difference between "right" and "wrong" in science is not some snooty, bureaucratic concept. You don't need a license or a blessing to do science right. You just need to ensure that the cause-effect relationships you choose to believe are actually correct. One of the rules for doing science right is that you measure instead of just asserting your opinion.

Different people have different thresholds of skepticism. Some people believe new ideas, whether they're true or false, with very little persuasion. The people who are persuaded easily to believe false things cannot contribute much useful new knowledge to their communities (irrespective of how much they might publish).