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Using Grafana Loki to be able to search and view all logs

This post is about how to make your log files being aggregated in a single place and easy searchable via a convenient web interface.

How to use DBMS_PIPE to halt and continue a PLSQL database session

I posted a message on twitter saying that DBMS_PIPE is an excellent mechanism to make a session run and halt in PLSQL. One response I gotten was asking for an example of that. That is what this post is about.

DBMS_PIPE is an implementation of a pipe inside the Oracle database. A pipe is a mechanism that is not limited to the Oracle database, in fact I assume the implementation is inspired by an operating system level pipe, which can be created using the ‘mknod /path/pipename p’ on unix and unix-like systems. A quick search shows windows has got them too, but not really, or does it? Another implementation is the pipe to redirect output from one command to the next using ‘|’. The essence of a pipe that input to and output from the pipe are separated from each other, and that information is flowing from the inputting process of the pipe to the outputting process.

The Oracle database museum: running old versions of the Oracle database

All Oracle database professionals know the current versions of the Oracle database (12.2, 18, 19, 20 at the moment of writing), and we also know the pace Oracle corporation keeps is so high that a lot of companies are having a hard time keeping up with the current versions. A prominent one is Oracle corporation itself for their E-Business suite software, where Oracle extended the support for the database for version 12.1.0.2 and 11.2.0.4 for E-Business suite licenses only. But this blog isn’t about bitching about the pace of Oracle support and versions getting desupported.

What’s new with Oracle database 19.7 versus 19.6

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 19 PSU 6 (january 2020) and 7 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 18.9 versus 18.10

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 18 PSU 9 (january 2020) and 10 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 12.1.0.2.200114 versus 12.1.0.2.200414

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 12.1.0.2 PSU 200114 (january 2020) and 200414 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Parameters
The list of parameters removed (first) and parameters added (second) is remarkable long.
It’s striking that a lot of solutions for bugs made configurable (_bug[0-9]*_.*) have been removed, and probably returned back as ‘spare parameters’.
Also some in memory (_inmemory.*) parameters have been removed.
Also some documented parameters; exafusion_enabled and optimizer_adaptive_plans and optimizer_adaptive_statistics, plus some standby parameters I wasn’t aware of existing.

What’s new with Oracle database 11.2.0.4.200114 versus 11.2.0.4.200414

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 200114 (january 2020) and 200414 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

Oracle library cache cursor child generation

This post is about library cache SQL cursors, and how these are managed by the database instance.

Oracle multi-tenant and library cache isolation

This post is the result of a question that I got after presenting a session about Oracle database mutexes organised by ITOUG, as a response to the conference cancellations because of COVID-19. Thank Gianni Ceresa for asking me!

The library cache provides shared cursors and execution plans. Because they are shared, sessions can take advantage of the work of previous sessions of creating these. However, by having these shared, access needs to be regulated not to have sessions overwrite each other’s work. This is done by mutexes.

The question I got was (this is a paraphrased from my memory): ‘when using pluggable databases, could a session in one pluggable database influence performance of a session in another pluggable database’?

Oracle rowcache fastgets

This blogpost is about the Oracle database row or dictionary cache. This is a separate cache that caches database metadata, like database object properties or user properties.

There is surprising little in-depth technical detail about the row cache. To some degree I understand: issues with the row cache are rare.

I noticed a column in V$ROWCACHE called ‘FASTGETS’. Whatever FASTGETS means, in my database it is being used: