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What’s new with Oracle database 18.8 versus 18.9

For the difference between Oracle database versions 18.8 and 18.9 this too follows the line of a low amount of differences.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name.

Also, the DBA and CDB table (DBA|CDB)_REGISTRY_BACKPORTS is back again. The disappearance of this table in 18.8 turned out to be a bug. There is a patch for 18.8 if you need this table.

What’s new with Oracle database 19.6 versus 19.5

As expected, there aren’t any really drastic differences between Oracle database version 19.5 and 19.6. Now that I am doing these series on differences for all the versions every quarter the new release updates are coming out, there is a certain line, and this release does follow that.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name. There is one documented parameter that was added: optimizer_session_type, which has gone official from “_optimizer_auto_index_allow”; see bug 29632611.

Advanced usage of gdb for profiling

This post is about how to use gdb, which is a debugger, so very simplistically put an aid for looking at C programs, as a profiler. I use gdb quite a lot for profiling because it’s the easiest way for profiling for me.

Lots of people which I know use other tools like perf, systemtap and dtrace for the same purpose and that’s fine. Each tools has its own advantages and disadvantages. One disadvantage of gdb is that it’s using ptrace to attach to a process, which makes it dead slow from a machine perspective, because everything it then does goes via another process, which is the debugger. That is how the debugger works.

Also lots of people use gdb like I do, and use basic functionality, which is breaking at functions, which makes it possible to find out the sequence of how functions are called, generating backtraces (stack traces) to understand the stack and maybe looking at functions arguments.

Where does the log writer spend its time on?

The Oracle database log writer is the process that fundamentally influences database change performance. Under normal circumstances the log writer must persist the changes made to the blocks before the actual change is committed. Therefore, it’s vitally important to understand what the log writer is exactly doing. This is widely known by the Oracle database community.

The traditional method for looking at log writer performance is looking at the wait event ‘log file parallel write’ and the CPU time, and comparing that to the ‘log file sync’ alias “commit wait time”. If ‘log file parallel write’ and ‘log file sync’ roughly match, a commit is waiting on the log writer IO latency, if it isn’t then it’s unclear, and things get vague.

Oracle wait event ‘log file parallel write’ change

This post is about a change in how the time is measured for the event ‘log file parallel write’. This is important for the performance tuning of any change activity in an Oracle database, because with the default commit settings, a foreground session that commits changes waits in the wait event ‘log file sync’, which is a wait on logwriter activity, for which the wait event ‘log file parallel write’ always has been the indicator of the time spend on IO.

Log file sync
First things first: a foreground session normally waits on the wait event ‘log file sync’ when it commits waiting for its change vectors to be written to the online redologfile(s) by the logwriter. It is wrong to always assume a ‘log file sync’ will be present. If, somehow, the logwriter manages to increase the ON DISK SCN to or beyond the foreground session’s commit SCN, there will be no ‘log file sync’ wait event.

Oracle database and grid home patches to install

This blogpost is about Oracle database and grid infrastructure software homes, which patches should be applied to which homes, and what it then looks like. This is fully documented by MyOracleSupport notes, but you will see that with version 18 and up this is unclear.

I keep a script-set that automatically installs and patches the Oracle database software and creates a database. This script-set is called vagrant-builder, and it can install any version with any PSU applied between 11.2.0.2 up to 19.5, which is the latest PSU of the latest version, with a few exceptions: for 11.2.0.2 and 11.2.0.3 I only created an install for the base version and the latest PSU for the database, and version 12.1.0.1 is left out entirely.

Oracle internal data dictionary oddity

This blogpost is about an inconsistency I found in the X$ tables X$KQFTA and X$KQFCO. This is very specific. If you don’t care about that, you can skip this post.

The Oracle database’s “dynamic performance views” are views that are prefixed with “GV$” and “V$”. The “G” with “GV$” stands for “global” and gets you the results from its “V$” equivalent for all instances. In most cases, but that’s not the purpose of this blog. In most cases, the “V$” version simply is the “GV$” view with inst_id (instance id, used in RAC to specify the instance id) set to the current instance. I’ll refer to both simply as “V$” for simplicity.

The “V$” views are mostly build on top of “X$” tables. The “X$” tables are Oracle internal tables, and not officially supported, therefore you should use the “V$” views.

What’s new with Oracle database 18.8 versus 18.7

The amount of changes between version 18.7 and 18.8 is truly minimal. There’s one spare parameter renamed to an underscore parameter, which seems to be a back port of functionality created version 19:

What’s new with Oracle database 19.5 versus 19.4

It seems that the most eye-catching difference between Oracle database versions 19.5 and 19.4 is three underscore parameters spare parameters being changed to specifically named underscore parameters, two of them have a bug number in them which is not publicly visible.

In v$sysstat/v$sesstat, a group of statistics are renamed from ‘OS %’ to ‘Server %’. All these statistics are about networking. One changed parameter directly points to networking (tcpinfo). These statistics are added in version 19.

One DBA view was added: DBA_DV_COMMON_OPERATION_STATUS. This view is specific and owned by to DVSYS.

Oracle memory troubleshooting using analysis on heapdumps, part 2

In the article oracle memory troubleshooting using analysis on heap dumps I introduced heap_analyze.awk.

The reason the tool exists is because I am using it myself. Therefore, I ran into additional things that I wanted the tool to do. I added some stuff, which is that significant, that I decided to make another blogpost to introduce the new features.

1. Percentages
In order to get an idea of the relative size of the summarised topic, I added a percentage. For example: