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Oracle EE

How long does a logical IO take?

This is a question that I played with for a long time. There have been statements on logical IO performance (“Logical IO is x times faster than Physical IO”), but nobody could answer the question what the actual logical IO time is. Of course you can see part of it in the system and session statistics (v$sysstat/v$sesstat), statistic name “session logical reads”. However, if you divide the number of logical reads by the total time a query took, the logical IO time is too high, because then it assumed all the time the query took was spend on doing logical IO, which obviously is not the case, because there is time spend on parsing, maybe physical IO, etc. Also, when doing that, you calculate an average. Averages are known to hide actual behaviour.

Investigating the full table direct path / buffered decision.

A lot of blogposts and other internet publications have been written on the full segment scan behaviour of a serial process starting from Oracle version 11gR2. This behaviour is the Oracle engine making a decision between scanning the blocks of a segment into the Oracle buffercache or scanning these blocks into the process’ private process global area (PGA). This decision is even more important on the Exadata platform, because the Oracle engine must have made the decision to read the blocks into the process’ PGA in order to be able to do a smartscan. This means that if you are on Oracle 11gR2 already, and thinking about using the Exadata platform, the wait event ‘direct path read’ gives you an indication on how much potentially could be offloaded on Exadata, if you keep all the settings the same.

Reading Oracle memory dumps

Every DBA working with the Oracle database must have seen memory dumps in tracefiles. It is present in ORA-600 (internal error) ORA-7445 (operating system error), system state dumps, process state dumps and a lot of other dumps.

This is how it looks likes:

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 4: Oracle 11.2.0.4 and AMM

This is the 4th post in a series of posts on PGA behaviour of Oracle. Earlier posts are: here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12), here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2) and the quiz on using PGA with AMM, into which this blogpost dives deeper.

As laid out in the quiz blogpost, I have a database with the following specifics:
-Oracle Linux x86_64 6u6.
-Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 4
-Oracle database (single instance) with the following parameter set: memory_target=1G. No other memory related parameters set.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 3: Oracle 11.2.0.4 and AMM: Quiz

This is a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database makes use of PGA. Earlier posts can be found here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12) and here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2).

Today a little wednesday fun: a quiz.

What do you think will happen in the following situation (leave a response as comment please!):

-Oracle Linux x86_64 6u6.
-Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 4
-Oracle database (single instance) with the following parameter set: memory_target=1G. No other memory related parameters set.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 2: Oracle 11.2

This is the second part of a series of blogpost on Oracle database PGA usage. See the first part here. The first part described SGA and PGA usage, their distinction (SGA being static, PGA being variable), the problem (no limitation for PGA allocations outside of sort, hash and bitmap memory), a resolution for Oracle 12 (PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT), and some specifics about that (it doesn’t look like a very hard limit).

But this leaves out Oracle version 11.2. In reality, the vast majority of the database that I deal with at the time of writing is at version 11.2, and my guess is that this is not just the databases I deal with, but a general tendency. This could change in the coming time with the desupport of Oracle 11.2, however I suspect the installed base of Oracle version 12 to increase gradually and smoothly instead of in a big bang.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA

This post is about memory management on the operating system level of an Oracle database. The first question that might pop in your head is: isn’t this a solved problem? The answer is: yes, if you use Oracle’s AMM (Automatic Memory Management) feature, which let’s you set a limit for the Oracle datababase’s two main memory area’s: SGA and PGA. But in my opinion any serious, real life, usage of an Oracle database on Linux will be (severely) constrained in performance because of the lack of huge pages with AMM, and I personally witnessed very strange behaviour and process deaths with the AMM feature and high demand for memory.

Physical IO on Linux

I posted a fair amount of stuff on how Oracle is generating IOs, and especially large IOs, meaning more than one Oracle block, so > 8KB. This is typically what is happening when the Oracle database is executing a row source which does a full segment scan. Let’s start off with a quiz: what you think Oracle is the maximum IO size the Oracle engine is capable of requesting of the Operating System (so the IO size as can be seen at the SCI (system call interface) layer? If you made up your answer, remember it, and read on!

The real intention of this blogpost is to describe what is going on in the Oracle database kernel, but also what is being done in the Linux kernel. Being a performance specialised Oracle DBA means you have to understand what the operating system does. I often see that it’s of the utmost importance to understand how an IO ends up as a request at the NAS or SAN head, so you understand what a storage admin is talking about.

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Reconstructing oratab from the cluster registry

At the Accenture Enkitec Group we have a couple of Exadata racks for Proof of Concepts (PoC), Performance validation, research and experimenting. This means the databases on the racks appear and vanish more than (should be) on an average customer Exadata rack (to be honest most people use a fixed few existing databases rather than creating and removing a database for every test).

Nevertheless we gotten in a situation where the /etc/oratab file was not in sync with the databases registered in the cluster registry. This situation can happen for a number reasons. For example, if you clone a database (RMAN duplicate), you end up with a cloned database (I sincerely hope), but this database needs to be manually registered in the cluster registry. This is the same with creating a standby database (for which one of the most used methods is to use the clone procedure with a couple of changes).