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Oracle I/O Performance

SLOB Chewed Up All My File System Space and Spit It Out. But, Why?

This is a quick blog post in response to a recent interaction with a SLOB user. The user reached out to me to lament that all her file system space was consumed as the result of a SLOB execution (runit.sh). I reminded her that runit.sh will alert to possible derelict mpstat/iostat/vmstat processes from an aborted SLOB test. If these processes exist they will be spooling their output to unlinked files.

The following screen shot shows what to expect if a SLOB test detects potential “deadwood” processes. If you see this sort of output from runit.sh, it’s best to investigate whether in fact they remain from an aborted test or whether there are other users on the system that left these processes behind.

 

SLOB Physical I/O Randomness. How Random Is Random? Random!

I recently read a blog post by Kyle Hailey regarding some lack of randomness he detected in the Orion I/O generator tool. Feel free to read Kyle’s post but in short he used dtrace to detect Orion was obliterating a very dense subset of the 96GB file Orion was accessing.

EMC XtremIO – The Full-Featured All-Flash Array. Interested In Oracle Performance? See The Whitepaper.

NOTE: There’s a link to the full article at the end of this post.

I recently submitted a manuscript to the EMC XtremIO Business Unit covering some compelling lab results from testing I concluded earlier this year. I hope you’ll find the paper interesting.

There is a link to the full paper at the bottom of this block post. I’ve pasted the executive summary here:

Oracle’s Timeline, Copious Benchmarks And Internal Deployments Prove Exadata Is The Worlds First (Best?) OLTP Machine – Part I

I recently took a peek at this online, interactive history of Oracle Corporation. When I got to the year 2008, I was surprised to see no mention of the production release of Exadata–the HP Oracle Database Machine. The first release of Exadata occurred in September 2008.

Once I advanced to 2009, however, I found mention of Exadata but I also found a couple of errors:

Modern Servers Are Better Than You Think For Oracle Database – Part I. What Problems Actually Need To Be Fixed?

Blog update 2012.02.28: I’ve received countless inquiries about the storage used in the proof points I’m making in this post. I’d like to state clearly that the storage is  not a production product, not a glimpse of something that may eventually become product or any such thing. This is a post about CPU, not about storage. That point will be clear as you read the words in the post.

In my recent article entitled How Many Non-Exadata RAC Licenses Do You Need to Match Exadata Performance I brought up the topic of processor requirements for Oracle with and without Exadata. I find the topic intriguing. It is my opinion that anyone influencing how their company’s Oracle-related IT budget is used needs to find this topic intriguing.