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Oracle XE

What’s new with Oracle database 19.7 versus 19.6

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 19 PSU 6 (january 2020) and 7 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 18.9 versus 18.10

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 18 PSU 9 (january 2020) and 10 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 12.1.0.2.200114 versus 12.1.0.2.200414

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 12.1.0.2 PSU 200114 (january 2020) and 200414 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Parameters
The list of parameters removed (first) and parameters added (second) is remarkable long.
It’s striking that a lot of solutions for bugs made configurable (_bug[0-9]*_.*) have been removed, and probably returned back as ‘spare parameters’.
Also some in memory (_inmemory.*) parameters have been removed.
Also some documented parameters; exafusion_enabled and optimizer_adaptive_plans and optimizer_adaptive_statistics, plus some standby parameters I wasn’t aware of existing.

What’s new with Oracle database 11.2.0.4.200114 versus 11.2.0.4.200414

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 200114 (january 2020) and 200414 (april 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

Oracle library cache cursor child generation

This post is about library cache SQL cursors, and how these are managed by the database instance.

Oracle multi-tenant and library cache isolation

This post is the result of a question that I got after presenting a session about Oracle database mutexes organised by ITOUG, as a response to the conference cancellations because of COVID-19. Thank Gianni Ceresa for asking me!

The library cache provides shared cursors and execution plans. Because they are shared, sessions can take advantage of the work of previous sessions of creating these. However, by having these shared, access needs to be regulated not to have sessions overwrite each other’s work. This is done by mutexes.

The question I got was (this is a paraphrased from my memory): ‘when using pluggable databases, could a session in one pluggable database influence performance of a session in another pluggable database’?

Oracle rowcache fastgets

This blogpost is about the Oracle database row or dictionary cache. This is a separate cache that caches database metadata, like database object properties or user properties.

There is surprising little in-depth technical detail about the row cache. To some degree I understand: issues with the row cache are rare.

I noticed a column in V$ROWCACHE called ‘FASTGETS’. Whatever FASTGETS means, in my database it is being used:

What’s new with Oracle database 12.2.0.1.191015 versus 12.2.0.1.200114

For the difference between Oracle database versions 12.2.0.1.191015 and 12.2.0.1.200114 this too follows the line of a low amount of differences.

There have been two spare parameters that have been changed to named undocumented parameters, and no data dictionary changes.

parameters unique in version 12.2.0.1.191015 versus 12.2.0.1.200114

NAME
--------------------------------------------------
_fifth_spare_parameter
_one-hundred-and-forty-eighth_spare_parameter

parameters unique in version 12.2.0.1.200114 versus 12.2.0.1.191015

NAME
--------------------------------------------------
_bug29825525_bct_public_dba_buffer_dynresize_delay
_enable_ptime_update_for_sys

On the C function side, there have been a group of AWR functions that have been removed and a group of SGA management functions, among other functions. There functions that have been added are random and diverse.

What’s new with Oracle database 18.8 versus 18.9

For the difference between Oracle database versions 18.8 and 18.9 this too follows the line of a low amount of differences.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name.

Also, the DBA and CDB table (DBA|CDB)_REGISTRY_BACKPORTS is back again. The disappearance of this table in 18.8 turned out to be a bug. There is a patch for 18.8 if you need this table.

What’s new with Oracle database 19.6 versus 19.5

As expected, there aren’t any really drastic differences between Oracle database version 19.5 and 19.6. Now that I am doing these series on differences for all the versions every quarter the new release updates are coming out, there is a certain line, and this release does follow that.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name. There is one documented parameter that was added: optimizer_session_type, which has gone official from “_optimizer_auto_index_allow”; see bug 29632611.