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Vagrant & Docker Builds : APEX 20.2 and other updates

The recent release of APEX 20.2 has triggered a build frenzy.

Vagrant

All my GitHub Vagrant builds that include APEX have been updated to APEX 20.2. The builds themselves are unchanged. This was literally an update to the environment files, so it took longer to test the builds than it did to make the changes.

Column Groups

Here’s an odd little detail about the statistics of column groups. At first glance it’s counter-intuitive but it’s actually an “obvious” (once you’ve thought about it for a bit) consequence of the approximate_ndv() algorithm for gathering stats.

I’ll present it as a question:

I have a table with two columns: flag and v1. Although the column are not declared as non-null neither holds any nulls. If there are 26 distinct values for flag, and 1,000,000 distinct values for v1, what’s the smallest number of distinct values I should see if I create the column group (flag, v1) ?

VirtualBox 6.1.16

VirtualBox 6.1.16 has been released.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

I’ve done the installation on Windows 10, macOS and Oracle Linux 7 hosts with no drama.

I’ll be running new Packer builds for the oraclebase/oracle-7 and oraclebase/oracle-8 vagrant boxes, so they should appear with the new version of the guest additions over the next day or so.

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Vagrant Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) Build

In today’s video we’ll discuss how to build a 2-node RAC setup using Vagrant.

This video is based on the OL8 19c RAC build, but it’s similar to that of the OL7 19c RAC build also. If you don’t have access to the patches from MOS, stick with the OL7 build, as it will work with the 19.3 base release. The GitHub repos are listed here.

If you need some more words to read, you can find descriptions of the builds here, as well as a beginners guide to Vagrant.

Why a One-Week Report for AWR Sizing in Azure

It’s not uncommon for different recommended practices to arise in technical sizing and optimization practices.  For many, it’s a compromise between most optimal data and ease of access vs. impact on production environments, which is no different from what we face when sizing Oracle on Azure.

Oracle 19c Automatic Indexing: Indexing Partitioned Tables Part I (Conversation Piece)

In this little series, I’m going to discuss how Automatic Indexing works in relation to Partitioning. I’ve discussed Indexing and Partitioning many times previously and how Oracle has various options when indexing a partitioned table: Non-Partitioned Index Globally Partitioned Index Locally Partitioned Index So the question(s) are how does Automatic Indexing handle scenarios with partitioned […]

Video : Temporal Validity in Oracle Database 12c Onward

In today’s video we discuss how Temporal Validity can make querying of effective date ranges simpler in Oracle 12c and beyond.

The video is based on this article.

The syntax looks similar to Flashback Query and Flashback Version Query.

Interval Oddity

Interval partitioning is a popular strategy for partitioning date-based data. It’s an enhanced variant of range partitioning that allows you to define a starting partition and an interval that should be used to derive the high values for all subsequent partitions – and Oracle doesn’t even have to create intervening partitions if you insert data that goes far beyond the current partition, it automatically creates exactly the right partition (with the correct high_value and correctly inferred lower boundary) for the incoming data and behaves as if the intervening partitions will become available when they’re needed at some later point in time.

Inline Hint

If you’ve ever used subquery factoring (“with” subqueries or common table expressions (CTEs) as they are often called) then you’re probably aware of the (undocumented) hints /*+ materialize */ , which forces Oracle to create a local temporary table to hold the result of the subquery for subsequent use, and /*+ inline */, which forces the optimizer to copy the text of the subquery into the body of the query before starting the optimisation phase.

There’s a small, but important, enhancement to these hints that appeared in Oracle 18. Like so many other hints in Oracle they can now have a query block name as a “parameter”, so you can use them at the top level of your query. Here’s some code to demonstrate:

Direct Path

This is a little addendum to a note I wrote a couple of days ago about serial direct path reads and KO (fast object checkpoint) enqueue waits.

The original note was prompted by a problem where someone had set the hidden parameter “_serial_direct_read” to ‘always’ because there were running 11g and wanted some “insert as select” statements to use direct path reads on the select portion and 11g wasn’t co-operating.

Serial direct path reads were introduced as a possibility in (at least) the 8.1.7.4 timeline, but the parameter was set to false until 11gR2 where it changed to auto. (Legal values are: false, true, never, auto, always.)