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Oracle

I’m not spamming your blog comments!

confused-panda-303949_640It has come to my attention that there is a new website in town that happens to have a URL extremely similar to mine. Literally one character different. The domain in question was registered on 3rd November 2015.

Let me first say, the site in question does not contain any of my content (*see update*) and as far as I know is not doing anything wrong from a content perspective. The reason I am writing this post is to protect myself.

Quiz Night

I was setting up a few tests on a copy of 12.1.0.2 recently when I made a mistake creating the table – I forgot to put in a couple of CAST() calls in the select list, so I just patched things up with a couple of “modify column” commands. Since I was planning to smash the table in all sorts of ways and it had taken me several minutes to create the data set (10 million rows) I decided to create a clean copy of the data so that I could just drop the original table and copy back the clean version – and after I’d done this I noticed something a little odd.

Here’s the code (cut down to just 10,000 rows), with a little output:

RMOUG 2016 – Controlling Execution Plans Workshop

Thanks to everyone that attended my session. Here’s a quick link to a zip file with the scripts I used in my Controlling Execution Plans Workshop presentation.

Controlling Execution Plans Workshop Zip File

Video: Amazon Web Services (AWS) : Relational Database Services (RDS) for MySQL

Here’s another video on my YouTube channel. This one is a quick run through of RDS for MySQL, a DBaaS offering from Amazon Web Services.

The video was based on this article.

If you watch the little outtake at the end you will hear me cracking up with the goofiest while filming Brian ‘Bex’ Huff‘s clip. :)

Cheers

Tim…

The Oracle wait interface granularity of measurement

The intention of this blogpost is to show the Oracle wait time granularity and the Oracle database time measurement granularity. One of the reasons for doing this, is the Oracle database switched from using the function gettimeofday() up to version 11.2 to clock_gettime() to measure time.

This switch is understandable, as gettimeofday() is a best guess of the kernel of the wall clock time, while clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC,…) is an monotonic increasing timer, which means it is more precise and does not have the option to drift backward, which gettimeofday() can do in certain circumstances, like time adjustments via NTP.

The first thing I wanted to proof, is the switch of the gettimeofday() call to the clock_gettime() call. This turned out not to be as simple as I thought.

Parallel DML

A recent posting on OTN presented a performance anomaly when comparing a parallel “insert /*+ append */” with a parallel “create table as select”.  The CTAS statement took about 4 minutes, the insert about 45 minutes. Since the process of getting the data into the data blocks would be the same in both cases something was clearly not working properly. Following Occam’s razor, the first check had to be the execution plans – when two statements that “ought” to do the same amount of work take very different times it’s probably something to do with the execution plans – so here are the two statements with their plans:

First the insert, which took 45 minutes:

Hinting

This is just a little example of thinking about hinting for short-term hacking requirements. It’s the answer to a question that came up on the Oracle-L listserver  a couple of months ago (Oct 2015) and is a convenient demonstration of a principle that can often (not ALWAYS) be applied as a response to the problem: “I can make this query work quickly once, how do I make it work quickly when I make it part of a join ?”

The question starts with this query, which returns “immediately” for any one segment:

Video: Amazon Web Services (AWS) : Relational Database Services (RDS) for Oracle

Here’s the latest video on my YouTube channel. This one is a quick run through of RDS for Oracle, a DBaaS offering from Amazon Web Services.

If you are not into the video thing, you can see the article this video was based on here.

Galo Balda has now joined the illustrious list of people who have said “.com” on one of my videos. :)

Partitioned Bitmap Join

If you don’t want to read the story, the summary for this article is:

If you create bitmap join indexes on a partitioned table and you use partition exchanges to load data into the table then make sure you create the bitmap join indexes on the loading tables in exactly the same order as you created them on the partitioned table or the exchange will fail with the (truthful not quite complete) error: ORA-14098: index mismatch for tables in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

Lex de Haan

Today marks the 10th anniversary of Lex de Haan passing away. Although 10 years is a long time, I think about my dear friend Lex at least once a week. Lex assisted me adapting to new teaching skills when I progressed to blindness. It was Lex his idea to use colored magnets on my classroom […]