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Oracle OpenWorld 2014 : The Journey Begins

I did my normal last minute packing last night. After a quick panic this morning, I was off in the taxi I for the airport.

I find it amazing how sense goes out of the window at airports. There was a big sign saying “Put empty trays on rollers”, so people were either leaving them or stacking them up. Either way, they were getting in the way. WTF? RTMF!

The first flight to Frankfurt was fine. While waiting to board I was staring at the guy in front thinking, “I’m sure I could do his fade better than that!” I might have to start hairdresser-base.com… :)

Is X a Big Data Product?

Virtually everyone in data space today claims that they are a Big Data vendor and that their products are Big Data products. Of course — if you are not in Big Data then you are legacy. So how do you know whether a product is a Big Data product?

While there might not be fully objective criteria (and mainly because Big Data definition is still in the air and people interpret it as they see fit for their purpose), I think I can provide one good suggestion on how to determine when a certain product is NOT a Big Data product. Of course, it will depend on the definition of Big Data that you believe in.

Lock Time

Here’s a little detail I was forced to re-learn yesterday; it’s one of those things where it’s easy to say “yes, obviously” AFTER you’ve had it explained so I’m going to start by posing it as a question. Here are two samples of PL/SQL that using locking to handle a simple synchronisation mechanism; one uses a table as an object that can be locked, the other uses Oracle’s dbms_lock package. I’ve posted the code for each fragment, and a sample of what you see in v$lock if two sessions execute the code one after the other:

Table locking – the second session to run this code will wait for the first session to commit or rollback:

Lovin’ la vida Oracle

As we prepare for the week of Oracle OpenWorld 2014, I look back on the 25 years I have spent within the orbit of Oracle Corporation.

I joined Oracle Consulting Services (OCS) as an employee on 15-January 1990 and worked my way to Technical Manager when I resigned to start my own consultancy on 31-July 1998.  I worked as an independent Oracle consultant from then (with a side trip into company-building with friends) until 30-April this year.  On 01-May 2014, I joined startup Delphix.

I must install Oracle on Fedora!

Followers of my blog and website know I play around with installations on Fedora for fun. All of my installation guides on Fedora come with a link at the top that points to this disclaimer.

A few times recently I’ve been contacted by people saying their boss, teacher or customer is insisting they install Oracle on Fedora. Rather than repeat myself, I’ve added another point at the bottom of this disclaimer that reads:

The Future of PL/SQL : The People Respond

I put out a post yesterday called The Future of PL/SQL : My Opinion.

For an Oracle-related blog, putting something out at the weekend is a sure fire way to get nobody reading it. If I look at my website, the hit rate at the weekend is about 1/5 of that of a week day. By the time most people get back to work on Monday they have a stack of blog posts to read and yours will probably fall into the “mark as read” pit of their RSS reader. :) In a similar fashion, people’s timelines on social media are generally so crowded, your “look what I’ve just written” tweet will probably be lost amongst the talk of alcohol, bad food and photos of the kids…

Partitioned Clusters

In case you hadn’t noticed it, partitioning has finally reached clusters in 12c – specifically 12.1.0.2. They’re limited to hash clusters with range partitioning, but it may be enough to encourage more people to use the technology. Here’s a simple example of the syntax:

The Future of PL/SQL : My Opinion

Although a lot of my effort at the moment is focused on DBA features, I have written some articles on PL/SQL enhancements. There are a few neat new features for PL/SQL developers in 12c, but you could be forgiven for thinking it is a little underwhelming. There are two ways to look at this:

  1. OMG. Oracle really don’t care about PL/SQL any more. If they did, there would be loads of new features.
  2. Wow. PL/SQL is so mature and cool that there is really not much more to add.

From a base language perspective, I think option 2 is closer to the mark. PL/SQL is a really stable, fast and mature language. There really isn’t very much that you can’t do with PL/SQL these days. So what is the future of PL/SQL in my opinion?

How to Configure EM12c to NOT Use Load Balancers

This may not come up very often, but for some reason, an administrator might have to reconfigure an EM12c environment to NOT use load balancers.

This could be due to: