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TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE Aggregation

The TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE data type that got introduced a long time ago is known for some oddities, for example Tony Hasler has a nice summary of some of them here.Here is another oddity that shows up when trying to aggregate on such a data type. Have a look at the following simple example:


create table t
as
select
rownum as id
, date '2000-01-01' + rownum - 1 as some_date
, cast(date '2000-01-01' + rownum - 1 as timestamp) as some_timestamp
, cast(date '2000-01-01' + rownum - 1 as timestamp with local time zone) as some_timestamp_with_local_tz
, cast(date '2000-01-01' + rownum - 1 as timestamp with time zone) as some_timestamp_with_timezone
from
dual
connect by

Speaking at E4 2013! … and some Exadata Patents good stuff

I’ll be co-speaking with Tyler Muth at E4  and we will be talking about Performance Visualization…
some of you may already know that I’m really a big fan of Tableau and just to give you an example on what the tool can do I’ve consolidated all the different viz that I’ve done during my sizing & performance gigs here http://goo.gl/xZHHY and Tyler has also been doing a lot of Exadata performance & benchmarking gigs lately and there were a couple of times where we collaborated on specific viz (him doing it on R) just to validate each other’s work. In short, we are passionate about this stuff. And we are going to be awesome :)

gather_plan_statistics – 2

Some time ago – actually a few years ago – I wrote a note about the hint /*+ gather_plan_statistics */ making some informal comments about the implementation and relevant hidden parameters. I’ve recently discovered a couple of notes from Alexander Anokhin describing the feature in far more detail and describing some of the misleading side effects of the implementaiton. There are two parts (so far): part 1 and part 2.

 

Parse Time

Dominic Brooks published a note recently about some very nasty SQL – originally thinking that it was displaying a run-time problem due to the extreme number of copies of the lnnvl() function the optimizer had produced. In fact it turned out to be a parse-time problem rather than a run-time problem, but when I first read Dominic’s note I was sufficiently surprised that I decided to try modelling the query.

Unfortunately the query had more than 1,000 predicates, (OR’ed together) and some of them included in-lists.  Clearly, writing this up by hand wasn’t going to be a good idea, so I wrote a script to generate both the data, and the query, as follows – first a table to query:

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Tool - Video Tutorial

A new major release (version 3.0) of my XPLAN_ASH tool is available for download.

You can download the latest version here.

In addition to many changes to the way the information is presented and many other smaller changes to functionality there is one major new feature: XPLAN_ASH now also supports S-ASH, the free ASH implementation.

If you run XPLAN_ASH in a S-ASH repository owner schema, it will automatically detect that and adjust accordingly.

XPLAN_ASH was tested against the latest stable version of S-ASH (2.3). There are some minor changes required to that S-ASH release in order to function properly with XPLAN_ASH. Most of them will be included in the next S-ASH release as they really are only minor and don't influence the general S-ASH functionality at all.

SLOB

Anyone who has used Kevin Closson’s “Silly Little Oracle Benchmark” will want to know about his significantly updated SLOB2.

Limiting the Degree of Parallelism via Resource Manager and a gotcha

This might be something very obvious for the reader but I had an interesting revelation recently when implementing parallel_degree_limit_p1 in a resource consumer group. My aim was to prevent users mapped to a resource consumer group from executing any query in parallel. The environment is fictional, but let’s assume that it is possible that maintenance operations for example leave indexes and tables decorated with a parallel x attribute. Another common case is the restriction of PQ resource to users to prevent them from using all the machine’s resources.

This can happen when you perform an index rebuild for example in parallel to speed the operation up. However the DOP will stay the same with the index after the maintenance operation, and you have to explicitly set it back:

Optimal Oracle Configuration for Efficient Table Scanning (Part One)

I just got permission from The UK Oracle Users Group to reproduce my article series on optimising scans in Oracle. Part One is available here, Part Two will follow shortly after, and then Part Three will be a few weeks away, following its publication in the magazine. Enjoy!