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Extended Stats

After my Masterclass on indexes at the UKOUG Tech2016 conference this morning I got into a conversation about creating extended stats on a table. I had pointed out in the masterclass that each time you dropped an index you really ought to be prepared to create a set of extended stats (specifically a column group) on the list of columns that had defined the index just in case the optimizer had been using the distinct_keys statistic from the index to help it calculate cardinalities.

Histogram Upgrade

I’ve written notes in the past about the improvements 12c introduces for histograms – particularly the frequency and top-N histograms which can be generated “free of charge” while the basic “approximate NDV” scans are taking place to gather stats. Gathering histograms in 12c is much safer than it used to be in earlier versions of Oracle even in the case of the new hybrid histograms (which are still sampled on a very small sample and therefore still a stability risk).

Anniversary OICA

Happy anniversary to me!

On this day 10 years ago I published the first article in my blog. It was about the parameter optimizer_index_cost_adj (hence OICA), a parameter that has been a  source of many performance problems and baffled DBAs over the years and, if you read my first blog posting and follow the links, a parameter that should almost certainly be left untouched.

Fixed Stats

There are quite a lot of systems around the world that aren’t using the AWR (automatic workload repository) and ASH (active session history) tools to help them with trouble shooting because of the licensing requirement – so I’m still finding plenty of sites that are using Statspack and I recently came across a little oddity at one of these sites that I hadn’t noticed before: one of the Statspack snapshot statements was appearing fairly regularly in the Statspack report under the “SQL Ordered by Elapsed Time” section – even when the application had been rather busy and had generated lots of other work that was being reported. It was the following statement – the collection of file-level statistics:

PK Histogram

One of the little myths of Oracle appeared on the Oracle-L list server a few days ago – the one that says: “you don’t need a histogram on a single column unique/primary key”.

Not only can a histogram be helpful on a column that’s declared to hold unique values, the optimizer may even spot the need automatically. It’s a little unusual (and probably the result of poor programming practice) but it does happen. Here’s an example demonstrating the principle:

Stats collection time

Yesterday I posted a note about querying dba_optstat_operations to get a quick report of how long calls to dbms_stats had been taking but said I had another script that helped to fill some of the gaps it left. One of my readers points out fairly promptely that 12c enhances the feature considerably, with a view dba_optstat_operation_tasks that (for example) lists all the tables processed during a single call to gather_schema_stats.

Well, I wrote my script years (if not decades) before 12c came out, so I’m going to publish it anyway.

Stats time

I don’t really remember how long it’s been since Oracle created an automatic log of how long a call to the dbms_stats package took, though it was probably some time in the 10g time-line. It wasn’t until it had been around for several years, though before I wrote little script (possibly prompted by a comment from Martin Widlake) that I’ve used occasionally since to see what’s been going on in the past, how variable stats collection times have been, and what unexpected dbms_stats call an application may have been making. Here’s what it currently looks like:

Index Sanity

By popular demand (well, one person emailed me to ask for it) I’m going to publish the source code for a little demo I’ve been giving since the beginning of the millennium – it concerns indexes and the potential side effects that you can get when you drop an index that you’re “not using”. I think I’ve mentioned the effect several times in the history of this blog, but I can’t find an explicit piece of demo code, so here it is – starting at the conclusion – as a cut and paste from an SQL*Plus session running against an 11g instance:

Stats History

From time to time we see a complaint on OTN about the stats history tables being the largest objects in the SYSAUX tablespace and growing very quickly, with requests about how to work around the (perceived) threat. The quick answer is – if you need to save space then stop holding on to the history for so long, and then clean up the mess left by the history that you have captured; on top of that you could stop gathering so many histograms because you probably don’t need them, they often introduce instability to your execution plans, and they are often the largest single component of the history (unless you are using incremental stats on partitioned objects***)

Column Groups

Patrick Jolliffe alerted the Oracle-L list to a problem that appears when you combine fixed length character columns (i.e. char() or nchar())  with column group statistics. The underlying cause of the problem is the “blank padding” semantics that Oracle uses by default to compare varchar2 with char, so I’ll start with a little demo of that. First some sample data: