Technical

Adaptive Log File Sync: Oracle, Please Don’t Do That Again

Disclaimer: much that follows is pure speculation on my part. It could be completely wrong and I’m putting it out there in the hopes that it’ll eventually be proven one way or the other.

Lessons from Africa, Part 2

Last week was busy… making travel arrangements for this week’s trip to New York (technically Jersey) and some light analysis of AWR reports from exadata RAT runs and some heavy troubleshooting of a Solaris x86 RAC cluster with random node reboots. (I think I finally traced the node reboots to a kernel CPU/scheduling problem). I really did thoroughly enjoy my time in Africa despite being nowhere near Oracle software – but it feels good to be working on challenging cluster problems again!

Lessons from Africa, Part 2

Last week was busy… making travel arrangements for this week’s trip to New York (technically Jersey) and some light analysis of AWR reports from exadata RAT runs and some heavy troubleshooting of a Solaris x86 RAC cluster with random node reboots. (I think I finally traced the node reboots to a kernel CPU/scheduling problem). I really did thoroughly enjoy my time in Africa despite being nowhere near Oracle software – but it feels good to be working on challenging cluster problems again!

Lessons From Rural Africa

It has been nine months since I’ve written here. Needless to say, a lot has happened!

First, my family was living in Africa for three months earlier this year while I did some tech work at an NGO hospital. Second, upon our return I decided to join the good people at Pythian. I’m not moving to Canada, although I will travel a decent bit as part of the company’s consulting group.

If you’re interested in the Africa trip, look at the Africa page. I wasn’t working with Oracle technology but it was still a very interesting, challenging and engaging project.

I thought I’d briefly share a few high-level insights. You might be surprised how well these lessons apply almost anywhere (even Oracle-related projects)!

Four Lessons from IT in Rural Africa

  1. Understand the Fundamentals

Lessons From Rural Africa

It has been nine months since I’ve written here. Needless to say, a lot has happened!

First, my family was living in Africa for three months earlier this year while I did some tech work at an NGO hospital. Second, upon our return I decided to join the good people at Pythian. I’m not moving to Canada, although I will travel a decent bit as part of the company’s consulting group.

If you’re interested in the Africa trip, look at the Africa page. I wasn’t working with Oracle technology but it was still a very interesting, challenging and engaging project.

I thought I’d briefly share a few high-level insights. You might be surprised how well these lessons apply almost anywhere (even Oracle-related projects)!

Four Lessons from IT in Rural Africa

  1. Understand the Fundamentals

Making Simple Performance Charts

Before I dive into this blog post, quick heads up for anyone attending UKOUG: on Tuesday only, I’ll be hanging out with some very smart people from the IOUG RAC Special Interest Group in the “gallery” above the exhibition hall. We’re ready to help anyone run a RAC cluster in a virtual environment on their own laptop. And if your laptop doesn’t meet the minimum requirements then you can try with one of our demo workstations. Come find us!!

Why Make Charts

I’ve heard Kyle Hailey speak on a few different occasions, and more than once he’s talked about the power of visualizing data. (In fact Kyle was a key person behind Grid Control’s performance screens.)

RAC Attack in OTN Lounge at OOW11

Want to get your hands on a key technology in both the Exadata Database Machine and the newly announced Oracle Database Appliance?

If you’ll be at OpenWorld – in just 11 days – then the IOUG RAC SIG is putting together a special event for you!  (You might have already heard about this on Twitter or from Justin at the OTN Blog.)

Every day from 9am to 1pm, find our table in the OTN Lounge (on Howard Street) and we’ll help you get an 11gR2 RAC cluster database running inside virtual machines on your own windows-based laptop. You can experiment boldly – if you make a mistake then you won’t have to start over; we can easily “reset” your virtual machines to any point.

Performance Tuning for Oracle Developers

One of my recent customers was a company with a somewhat large warehouse (around 60TB) on Oracle 10gR2.  The system was using RAC, though it was a fairly simple setup: two nodes, very large AIX LPARs, workload manually partitioned between them and somewhat evenly balanced.  The most important demand of their business is a large number of reports that must be generated every day from the warehouse.  These reports were beginning to take most of the day and consume a large amount of resources… and the current forecast is for dramatic data growth later this year.  So our project goal was to improve performance.

Developer Access To 10046 Trace Files

Lets suppose you are a DBA at a large company. You have some great developers, and they’re learning all about how to turn on full logging of their code through the 10046 database trace. They just learned how to use this data in summary form to find out – at a very detailed level – what’s REALLY taking up all the time during their big batch program which runs too long. They’re salivating over this trace data – but you work for a big company with security policies that can’t be easily changed, where developers rarely get any kind of shell-level or filesystem-level access to a database server. You WANT them to have the ability to profile their own database code… but every time they run a trace, you get dragged into a long email exchange to locate their tracefile and transfer it to a network drive where they can access it. We’re so close to a great situation… but this last part is such a drag!!!

Finally on Twitter

Overheard in an IRC chat room (Freenode#oracle) this morning…