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Tuning

The holistic SQL tuning series

I did a set of articles for Oracle Magazine on a more holistic view of SQL tuning. What do I mean by “holistic”? It was a reflection of a common problem that I see when questions come into AskTOM, or when people in the community approach me at conferences, namely, there is an inclination to dive straight into the deepest levels of the tuning exercise:

  • “What index should I create?”
  • “Should I increase the parallel degree?”

etc etc. And as technical practitioners, it is an easy trap to fall into. We too often fail to step back and approach the problem from its true requirement – that of, satisfying a business need. We might end up deep in the code, but we should probably not start there.

Resumable

There are two questions about temporary space that appear fairly regularly on the various Oracle forums. One is of the form:

From time to time my temporary tablespace grows enormously (and has to be shrunk), how do I find what’s making this happen?

The other follows the more basic pattern:

My process sometimes crashes with Oracle error: “ORA-01652: unable to extend temp segment by %n in tablespace %s” how do I stop this happening?

Before moving on to the topic of the blog, it’s worth pointing out two things about the second question:

Updatable Join Views

Here’s a quick “how to”.

If you want to update a column in table A with a column value from table B, then there’s a simple way to check if the required result can be achieved through an updatable join view.

Step 1: write a query that joins table A to table B and reports the rows in table A that you want to update, with the value from table B that should be used to update them, e.g.

Troubleshooting

A recent thread on the Oracle Developer Community starts with the statement that a query is taking a very long time (with the question “how do I make it go faster?” implied rather than asked). It’s 12.1.0.2 (not that that’s particularly relevant to this blog note), and we have been given a number that quantifies “very long time” (again not particularly relevant to this blog note – but worth mentioning because your “slow” might be my “wow! that was fast” and far too many people use qualitative adjectives when the important detail is quantative). The query had already been running for 15 hours – and here it is:

sql_patch

This note is a short follow-up to a note I wrote some time ago about validating foreign key constraints where I examined the type of SQL Oracle generates internally to do the validation between parent and child tables.  In that article I suggested (before testing) that you could create an SQL patch for the generated SQL to over-ride the plan taken by Oracle – a plan dictated to some extent by hints (including a “deprecated” ordered hint) embedded in the code. I did say that the strategy might not work for SQL optimised by SYS, but it turned out that it did.

Here’s a little script I ran to test a few variations on the theme:

Split Partition

This is a little case study on “pre-emptive trouble-shooting”, based on a recent question on the ODC database forum asking about splitting a range-based partition into two at a value above the current highest value recorded in a max_value partition.

The general principle for splitting (range-based) partitions is that if the split point is above the current high value Oracle will recognise that it can simply rename the existing partition and create a new, empty partition, leaving all the indexes (including the global and globally partitioned indexes) in a valid state. There are, however, three little wrinkles to this particular request:

Less slamming V$SQL

It’s a holiday here today in Perth, so a very brief blog post because I’ve been busy doing other things today Smile

IMG_20190303_114220_012

Table order

Over the last few days I’ve highlighted on Twitter a couple of older posts showing how a change in the order that tables appear in the from clause could affect the execution plan of a query. In one case the note was purely theoretical describing a feature of the way the optimizer works with simple query blocks, in the other case the note was about an anomaly with table elimination that could appear with both “ANSI” and “traditional” Oracle syntax.

Oracle wait event ‘TCP Socket (KGAS)’

I was asked some time ago what the Oracle database event ‘TCP socket (KGAS)’ means. This blogpost is a deep dive into what this event times in Oracle database 12.1.0.2.180717.

This event is not normally seen, only when TCP connections are initiated from the database using packages like UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP and the one used in this article, UTL_HTTP.

A very basic explanation is this event times the time that a database foreground session spends on TCP connection management and communicating over TCP, excluding client and database link (sqlnet) networking. If you trace the system calls, you see that mostly that is working with a (network) socket. Part of the code in the oracle database that is managing that, sits in the kernel code layer kgas, kernel generic (of which I am quite sure, and then my guess:) asynchronous services, which explains the naming of the event.

ODBV3 – more comfortable usage

It has been crazy few months – organizing POUG2018 took a lot of energy but it was satisfying as hell! </p />
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