Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 44 guests online.

Recent comments

Affiliations

LOBREAD SQL Trace entry in Oracle 11.2 (and tracing OPI calls with event 10051)

A few days ago I looked into a SQL Tracefile of some LOB access code and saw a LOBREAD entry there. This is a really welcome improvement (or should I say, bugfix of a lacking feature) for understanding resource consumption by LOB access OPI calls. Check the bottom of the output below:

*** 2011-03-17 14:34:37.242
WAIT #47112801352808: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 189021 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99584 tim=1300390477242725
WAIT #0: nam='gc cr multi block request' ela= 309 file#=10 block#=20447903 class#=1 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243368
WAIT #0: nam='cell multiblock physical read' ela= 283 cellhash#=379339958 diskhash#=787888372 bytes=32768 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243790
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243865
[...snipped...]
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244205
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 4 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244221
WAIT #0: nam='gc cr multi block request' ela= 232 file#=10 block#=20447911 class#=1 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244560
WAIT #0: nam='cell multiblock physical read' ela= 882 cellhash#=379339958 diskhash#=787888372 bytes=32768 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245579
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 16 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2020 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245685
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 6 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245706
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 5 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1792 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245720
#ff0000;">LOBREAD: c=1000,e=2915,p=8,cr=5,cu=0,tim=1300390477245735

In past versions of Oracle the CPU (c=) usage figures and other stats like number of physical/logical reads of the LOB chunk read OPI call were just lost – they were never reported in the tracefile. In past only the most common OPI calls, like PARSE, EXEC, BIND, FETCH (and recently CLOSE cursor) were instrumented with SQL Tracing. But since 11.2(.0.2?) the LOBREAD’s are printed out too. This is good, as it reduces the amount of guesswork needed to figure out what are those WAITs for cursor #0 – which is really a pseudocursor.

Why cursor#0? It’s because normally, with PARSE/EXEC/BIND/FETCH, you always had to specify a cursor slot number you operated on (if you fetch from cursor #5, it means that Oracle process went to slot #5 in the open cursor array in your session’s UGA and followed the pointers to shared cursor’s executable parts in library cache from there). But LOB interface works differently – if you select a LOB column using your query (cursor), then all your application gets is a LOB LOCATOR (sort of a pointer with LOB item ID and consistent read/version SCN). Then it’s your application which must issue another OPI call (LOBREAD) to read the chunks of that LOB out from the database. And the LOB locator is independent from any cursors, it doesn’t follow the same cursor API as regular SQL statements (as it requires way different functionality compared to a regular select or update statement).

So, whenever a wait happened in your session due to an access using a LOB locator, then there’s no specific cursor responsible for it (as far as Oracle sees internally) and that’s why a fake, pseudocursor #0 is used.

Note that on versions earlier than 11.2(.0.2?) when the LOBREAD wasn’t printed out to trace – you can use OPI call tracing (OPI stands for Oracle Program Interface and is the server-side counterpart to OCI API in the client side) using event 10051. First enable SQL Trace and then the event 10051 (or the other way around if you like):

SQL> @oerr 10051

ORA-10051: trace OPI calls

SQL> alter session set events '10051 trace name context forever, level 1';

Session altered.

Now run some LOB access code and check the tracefile:

*** 2011-03-17 14:37:07.178
WAIT #47112806168696: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 6491763 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627178602
OPI CALL: type=105 argc= 2 cursor=  0 name=Cursor close all
CLOSE #47112806168696:c=0,e=45,dep=0,type=1,tim=1300390627178731
OPI CALL: type=94 argc=28 cursor=  0 name=V8 Bundled Exec
=====================
PARSING IN CURSOR #47112802701552 len=19 dep=0 uid=93 oct=3 lid=93 tim=1300390627179807 hv=1918872834 ad='271cc1480' sqlid='3wg0udjt5zb82'
select * from t_lob
END OF STMT
PARSE #47112802701552:c=1000,e=1027,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=1,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627179805
EXEC #47112802701552:c=0,e=29,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=0,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627179884
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627179939
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 238812 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627418785
OPI CALL: type= 5 argc= 2 cursor= 26 name=FETCH
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627418945
FETCH #47112802701552:c=0,e=93,p=0,cr=5,cu=0,mis=0,r=1,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627418963
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 257633 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627676629
#ff0000;">OPI CALL: type=96 argc=21 cursor=  0 name=#ff0000;">LOB/FILE operations
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627676788
[...snip...]
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1792 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627677054
LOBREAD: c=0,e=321,p=0,cr=5,cu=0,tim=1300390627677064

Check the bold and especially the red string above.  Tracing OPI calls gives you some extra details of what kind of tasks are executed in the session. The “LOB/FILE operations” call indicates that whatever lines come after it (unlike SQL trace call lines where all the activity happens before a call line is printed (with some exceptions of course)) are done for this OPI call (until a next OPI call is printed out). OPI call tracing should work even on ancient database versions…

By the way, if you are wondering, what’s the cursor number 47112801352808 in the “WAIT #47112801352808″ above? Shouldn’t the cursor numbers be small numbers?

Well, in 11.2.0.2 this was also changed. Before that, the X in CURSOR #X (and PARSE #X, BIND #X, EXEC #X, FETCH #X) represented the slot number in your open cursor array (controlled by open_cursors) in your session’s UGA. Now, the tracefile dumps out the actual address of that cursor. 47112801352808 in HEX is 2AD94DC9FC68 and it happens to reside in the UGA of my session.

Naturally I asked Cary Millsap about whether he had spotted this LOBREAD already and yes, Cary’s way ahead of me – he said that Method-R’s mrskew tool v2.0, which will be out soon, will support it too.

It’s hard to not end up talking about Cary’s work when talking about performance profiling and especially Oracle SQL trace, so here are a few very useful bits which you should know about:

If you want to understand the SQL trace & profiling stuff more, then the absolute must document is Cary’s paper on the subject – Mastering Performance with Extended SQL Trace:

Also, if you like to optimize your work like me (in other words: you’re proactively lazy ;-) and you want to avoid some boring “where-the-heck-is-this-tracefile-now” and “scp-copy-it-over-to-my-pc-for-analysis” work then check out Cary’s MrTrace plugin (costs ~50 bucks and has a 30-day trial) for SQL Developer. I’ve ended up using it myself regularly although I still tend to avoid GUIs:

Share