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Connecting Hadoop and Oracle

Here are the slides of my yesterday’s OakTableWorld presentation. They also include a few hints about what our hot new venture Gluent is doing (although bigger annoucements come later this year).

[direct link]

Also, if you are at Oracle OpenWorld right now, my other presentation about SQL Monitoring in 12c is tomorrow at 3pm in Moscone South 103. See you there!


NB! After a 1.5 year break, this year’s only Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting training class (updated with Oracle 12c content) takes place on 16-20 November & 14-18 December 2015, so sign up now if you plan to attend this year!

The “as a Service” paradigm.

For the last few days I have been at Oracle Open World 2015 (OOW15) learning about the future plans and directions for Oracle. I’ve come to a striking realisation, which I will reveal at the end.

The message being pressed forward very hard is that of compute services being provided “As A Service”. This now takes three flavours:

  1. Being provided by a 3rd party’s hardware via the internet, ie in The Cloud.
  2. Having your own hardware controlled and maintained by you but providing services with the same tools and quick-provisioning ideology as “cloud”. This is being called On Premise (or just “On Prem” if you are aiming to annoy the audience), irrespective of the probably inaccuracy of that label (think hosting & dedicated compute away from head office)
  3. A mix of the two where you have some of your system in-house and some of it floating in the Cloud. This is called Hybrid Cloud.

There are many types of  “as a Service offerings, the main ones probably being

  • SaaS -Software as a Service
  • PaaS – Platform as a Service
  • DBaas – Database as a a Service
  • Iass – Infrastructure as a Service.

Whilst there is no denying that there is a shift of some computer systems being provided by any of these, or one of the other {X}aaS offerings, it seems to me that what we are really moving towards is providing the hardware, software, network and monitoring required for an IT system. It is the whole architecture that has to be considered and provided and we can think of it as Architecture as a Service or AaaS. This quick provisioning of the architecture is a main win with Cloud, be it externally provided or your own internal systems.

We all know that whilst the provision time is important, it is really the management of the infrastructure that is vital to keeping a service running, avoiding outages and allowing for upgrades. We need a Managed Infrastructure (what I term MI) to ensure the service provided is as good as or better than what we currently have. I see this as a much more important aspect of Cloud.

Finally, it seems to me that the aspects that need to be considered are more than initially spring to mind. Technically the solutions are potentially complex, especially with hybrid cloud, but also there are complications of a legal, security, regulatory and contractual aspect. If I have learnt anything over the last 2+ decades in IT it is that complexity of the system is a real threat. We need to keep things simple where possible – the old adage of Keep It Simple, Stupid is extremely relevant.

I think we can sum up the whole situation by combining these three elements of architecture, managed infrastructure and simplicity into one encompassing concept, which is:




And yes, that was a very long blog post for a pretty weak joke. 5 days of technical presentations and non-technical socialising does strange things to your brain

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : Monday

Monday started with a trip to the gym, where I met Scott Spendolini. At the end on the session, we were sitting on bikes next to each other chatting, whilst peddling at an incredibly slow rate. After getting cleaned up, we headed over to Lori’s Diner and ate more calories than be burned at the gym. :)

From there we headed down to the conference. I spent some time chatting to folks at the OTN Lounge, where I met one of my former colleagues Ian MacDonald. He had just come out of an Oracle Forms 12c session and I had a bunch of questions to ask also, so we headed down to the demo grounds to find the Oracle Forms stand, where then spent ages talking to Michael Ferrante about life, the universe and everything Forms related. :)

As I mentioned the other day, the installation and configuration of Forms and Reports has changed in 12c. During my first run through I noticed the Web Tier that links everything together was present in the domain, but not configured during the process. I was curious if I had done something wrong, if it was expected behaviour or if it was an implied statement of direction. I guess the web tier is surplus to requirements for many people if they are fronting their infrastructure with a reverse proxy or a load balancer. It turned out to be expected behaviour, and we discussed the configuration of the web tier, which is very simple. Just amend a couple of files and copy them to the “moduleconf” directory under the OHS instance. Happy days.

We also got a demo of the installation of the Forms Builder on Windows, which no longer needs a WebLogic installation, making it a much smaller footprint for developer machines. Our developers still use Forms 10g Builder. We then take the finished forms, move them to the server and recompile to 11gR2. It’s a pain, but simpler than putting Forms Builder 11gR2 on their PCs. If we can move to 12c Forms, they should be able to use the latest builder again. :)

From there I moved on to the SQL Developer demo stand, where I got to speak to Kris Rice and Jeff Smith, who are always good value. While I was there Jagjeet Singh, Sanjay Kumar and Baljeet Bhasin came up to say hello to me, which was really nice. Of course, I filmed them doing a group “.com”… :)

After that it I did a tour of the exhibition stands looking for things of interest. I used the GoPro to film a walk around some of the exhibition. I’ll see if I can make a little montage out of that…

Next, I went back to the OTN Lounge and spoke to a whole bunch of people, and filmed a load of “.com” cameos for forthcoming YouTube videos. :)

Then it was the weary walk back to the hotel, where I crashed for the night.

I think tomorrow may well be another demo grounds day…





Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : Monday was first posted on October 27, 2015 at 6:21 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Live Streaming Oaktable World!

UPDATE: recorded videos now available

If you can’t make it in person to Oaktable World, check it out via live streaming !


here is the agendaScreen Shot 2015-10-02 at 11.05.49 AM

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 2.15.55 PM

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : User Group Sunday

My wake up times are getting gradually later and later. That’s a good thing for now, but will make the journey home harder. :)

The day started with a bit of work on those articles I mentioned yesterday, with the inevitable trip to Lori’s Diner for breakfast of course.

I headed off to the gym, which felt super-hard. I’m trying to get some cardio in every day, in addition to the weights. I enjoy lifting weights, but if you are fat it just makes you look bigger, so in clothes you look even fatter. I despise cardio, but it is a necessary evil. I’ve been pretty good on the exercise front since I’ve been away. Not so good on the eating front though… :)

During the day we had the EMEA User Group Community session called “More Than Another 12 on Oracle Database 12c”. I was one of the 16 speakers, which included:

We each got 7 minutes for our particular topic and a buzzer went off when your time was up, so there was no over-running. :) Some were much quicker than others, but that’s all good. We had a 2 hour block and we finished at about 1 hour and 45 minutes, so we I think we did pretty well.

I really like this format. If there is a topic you are not into, you are only 7 minutes away from the next speaker. It also forces you to be extremely specific and direct your talk. You can get a lot done in 7 minutes if you need to. I’ve uploaded a video of my section of the talk.

I hope the audience enjoyed it as much as the speakers. Please send your feedback, so we know if we should do this sort of thing again next year…

After the session, I chatted to a few people, including Gilbert Standen. You may have seen me tweet about some of the Oracle RAC on Ubuntu stuff he does. It’s pretty interesting and far more geeky than the stuff I do. :) He gave me a t-shirt and swag, which I’ll hopefully remember to wear at my session on Wednesday. :)

After chatting to a few folks, I hooked up with Jonathan Lewis and we went off to Ghirardelli to eat ice cream and chat about the stuff that had happened so far this year at San Francisco. I didn’t realise he was an ice cream fiend. :)

After that, we headed back to the OTN lounge for the group photo, but found we were too late, so when you are looking at it, imagine were are there too. :) Then it was back to the hotel to dump our stuff before heading to the Oracle ACE dinner.

This years ACE dinner was really nice, although semi-clad dancing girls, contortionists and silks performers were conspicuous by their absence. :) Jokes aside, what made it nice was it was great for mingling. Everyone was on their feet, moving round the room chatting to each other. As well as all the usual suspects, I got to speak to a bunch of people from the OTN tours I’ve been on. It’s always good to reconnect and talk about the next visit. :) I also got to speak to Liron Amitzi about his recent move to Vancouver, which is a pretty interesting life change! You also get to meet some people in person for the first time. I was really happy to finally meet Mahir M. Quluzade in person. I feel like I already know him, but now we have met. :)

At about 22:00 we got on the bus and headed back to the hotel, where I completely zonked out!

All in all, it was a good day!

This morning is the start of the main OOW15 conference and I’m already knackered. :)



Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : User Group Sunday was first posted on October 26, 2015 at 3:21 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : Day Off

You might have guessed from my last post, I was feeling a little bit deflated (insert fat joke here) yesterday morning.

I cheered myself up by spending the day in my hotel room doing installations. :)

On Friday evening the new Fusion Middleware 12.2.1 stack was released, so spent the day playing with it. I’ve written some articles, but they will need some tidying up when I get home. There are definitely some things I want to change.

The Forms and Reports Services installation is very different compared to the previous version. After completing the WebLogic installation, you have to install the FRS software, run the RCU, then create the FRS domain as three separate steps. In the previous version, the installation and configuration of FRS was a single step. If you’ve configured WebLogic 12.1 clustered domains, it will feel very familiar. If not, it’s probably going to mess with your mind a little at first. :)

I’ve done the FRS domain creation also, but the configuration of the web tier is not complete. If you want to see what I’ve got so far you can check it out here, but as the warning says, it’s a work in progress.

The OPMN stuff is out of the door and NodeManager has stepped in. If I don’t have time before, I will work through everything when I get home and knock them into shape.

I reserve the right to throw this all away and start again when I get home and spend more time on it. :)



Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : Day Off was first posted on October 26, 2015 at 1:45 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Cloud Perspective: Cool New Stuff or Same Old Stuff ?

Is “The Cloud” Cool New Stuff or is it the Same Old Stuff ?

Cloud is upon us! Everywhere you turn vendors are offering cloud solutions promising (once-again) a single solution to solve the ills of our IT organizations.

Bah! Some naysayers say “this is just the same-old, same-old, we’ve been doing the cloud for years” – hmmmm is this really true?

Ways in Which Cloud is Not New:

  1. Accessing data over communication lines has been normal for years
  2. Hosting data at off-premise sites has likewise been around for years
  3. Vendors providing hosted, pre-defined platforms are as old as H. Ross Perot’s Service Bureau in 1962
  4. Vendors providing shared resources are as old as the Time-Sharing systems first introduced at Dartmouth in the 1960’s

But guess what? Not only is the cloud more-advanced than what’s gone before, it has properties that have never-before been available. So, what’s changed to enable this? Today’s communications systems are reliable (at least mostly), fast, and distributed making cloud-based resources as performant as our own resources. But, that’s still not it.

Defining the Cloud

In order to understand what makes the cloud “the cloud” –good folks at NIST (U.S. National Institute of Science and Technology have devoted some effort defining exactly what cloud means (at least to NIST). Here is the URL for a PDF document detailing NIST’s definition of cloud computing: .

Five Essential Characterizes of Cloud Computing

NIST defines five essential characteristics for cloud computing (paraphrased below):

  1. On-demand self-service: allowing a consumer to provision computing time and storage without human interaction with the provider.
  2. Broad Network Access: allowing all clients (mobile phones, tablets, laptops, workstations, etc.) access via standard network mechanisms.
  3. Resource pooling: where resources (memory, processing, storage, bandwidth, etc.) of the provider are assigned to consumers using a multi-tenant model with actual resources (physical and/or virtual) being assigned and reassigned based upon consumer usage. The consumer has little or no direct control over the specific resources being used.
  4. Rapid elasticity: resources assigned to a consumer may be acquired and/or released automatically according to usage allowing consumer systems to scale seemingly without limit (other than budget) when needs expand and retract again automatically when need subsides.
  5. Measured service: provides monitoring, control, and optimization of resources allowing both consumer and provider to understand exactly what resources are being used and by which users.

These five traits are what are new (ish). In the past provisioning of computing time, processors, and storage was based upon up-front estimates and contractually agreed to – with cloud it’s self-service and on-demand. In the past network access also meant contracts with telephone providers or Internet providers usually along well-defined pathways, perhaps using load-balancers and other technology to allow some broader access. Most cloud providers provide regional and sometimes global ability to access resources as part of the services provided. Resource pooling came along with the virtual computing wave a few years ago but with the cloud the pooling is managed by the cloud provider to meet service level agreements. Rapid elasticity is perhaps the most-obvious advantage of using the cloud; if an organization needs to ramp up for a busy time of year a good cloud service will simply expand their memory and disk capacity as needed, then, when things slow down take the excess resources away – all automatically making sure you spend money only for resources you need when you need them. Finally measured service, again an area where we have experience already but with a key difference, cloud systems can measure use to control elasticity and pooling automatically allowing applications to run and again making sure that costs are in line with usage.

Cloud service models: IaaS, PaaS, SaaS

Many, many acronyms come along with the cloud; here are three that are pretty common:

  • IaaS                 Infrastructure as a Service
  • PaaS                Platform as a Service
  • SaaS                Software as a Service

IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) means that the cloud provider gives you: Hardware, Operations, and maybe core operating systems. They provide the hardware and datacenter but you build your own systems. Your organization no longers needs to worry about the day-to-day operations of a datacenter.

PaaS (Platform Platform as a Service) means the provider is responsible for some core software load in addition to the hardware. The core software load usually includes the Operating System, Backup & Recovery, and Disaster Recovery. It is also possible that the PaaS contract will include a database (DBaaS) and/or a web server (WSaaS). Your organization needs to populate the database and provide the programs but the “plumbing” is part of the PaaS contract. The provider employs the Database and Network administrators in addition to providing the hardware and operations teams.

SaaS (Software as a Service) means that the provider has it all, they provide the Infrstructure, Platform, and the Software Stack. Think ERP systems like SalesForce or Oracle’s Fusion. Your organization simply uses the applications presented by the vendor, all of the underlying structure is provided by the vendor.

Your organizations journey into the cloud will involve choosing Iaas, PaaS, SaaS, or some combination of them with your on-premise existing systems.

Here’s a less-technical example to explain transportation options.

On-Premises IaaS PaaS SaaS
Personal Car Leased Car Rented Car City Bus
– Your car
– You buy gas
– Your maintenance
– You choose direction of travel
– You choose travel schedule
– Provider’s car
– You buy gas
– You provide maintenance
(or maybe vendor does depends upon contract)
– You choose direction of travel
– You choose travel schedule
– Provider’s car
– Gas purchase might be an option
– Provider’s maintenance
– You choose direction of travel
– You choose travel schedule
– Provider’s vehicle
– Provider’s gas
– Provider’s maintenance
– Provider has fixed route
– Provider has fixed schedule

Cloud Deployment: Public, Private, Hybrid

Finally, we get to deployment. Cloud offerings offer deployment options typically defined as Public, Private, and Hybrid:

  • Public             You have private areas in public resource pools
  • Private            Your resources stored in private resource pools
  • Hybrid                        Some combination of the above

Most usage today is Public or Hybrid; some companies have legal requirements that govern the location and availability of data and Private might be an option for them.

Some people are concerned about the security of data in the public cloud.

Really? What’s your organization’s budget for security? What do you suppose the
budget is at Oracle, Amazon, or Microsoft for security? If cloud providers slip once; public embarrassment and exit of customers follows. I think your data is probably safer in the cloud.

(with two caveats:

  1. If you leave the cloud vendor are you guaranteed that your data/code is wiped?
  2. Are you certain that daily backup/recovery and disaster recovery services at the vendor isolate your data to guarantee it is not accidentally shared with others?)

Some Current Cloud Providers

Some current provider options include: AWS (Amazon Web Services), Microsoft Azure, Oracle, and Google. There are also lots of smaller “boutique” providers; my guess is that they will have difficulty competing with the large companies and may be targeted for purchase.

Why Cloud Is a Great Move For Your Company

Most companies do not want to be in the data center business. Moving to the cloud allows an organization to effectively outsource all or part of their IT operations. Organizations also gain the advantage of cloud’s features.

In summary, cloud is a significant enhancement of the “same-old-stuff” adding capabilities for:

  • On-demand self-service
  • Broad Network Access
  • Resource pooling
  • Rapid elasticity
  • Measured service

Finally, cloud is everywhere, and the cloud is here to stay.




Oracle Open World 2015: The Art and Craft of Tracing

Thank you very much to those who attended my session The Art and Craft of Tracing in the #IOUG User Group track. It was a great pleasure seeing standing room only, especially on a slot right after lunch. I hope you found the session useful.

Download the presentation here and the scripts I used here.

As always, I would love to hear from you. Please use the comments space to give your feedback or send me an email, or tweet (@ArupNanda), or facebook post.

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : ACE Director Briefing : Final Thoughts

ace-directorSo it’s the day after the 2 day ACE Director Briefing and I’ll try to lay out my feelings about what I heard. I can’t of course mention details.

First off, the briefing itself was great. Many thanks to the team running the ACE program for putting this all together and persuading all the speakers to come. The same goes to the speakers, that give up their time at one of the busiest periods of the year. Despite what you may feel, your presence is much appreciated. :)

For those that have never attended one, the ACE Director Briefing is pretty much a private 2 day conference (mostly under NDA) which can be a little intense, especially when it comes before a 5 day conference. The content covers a whole range of the Oracle product stack, which is great for a generalist like me, but can be a little hard to cope with for those ACEs that specialise more. My advice to those people is, use it to pick up the buzzwords and identify the ACEs and Oracle staff that work in those areas. You never know when you will need some information and knowing the go-to kids is a quick and “safe” way to get it. You don’t have to know everything, just where to find it. :)

I guess my overall feeling this year is one of frustration, but for a number of reasons.

  • I am undoubtedly a generalist, so I have a finger in many pies, so to speak. As a result of that, I can’t be “amazing” at any of them. The classic Jack of all trades, master of none. When you are hit hard with a bunch of sessions from different areas, it makes you realise how rubbish you are at many of them, and that’s kind-of frustrating. It’s nice to sit at home and kid yourself you are awesome, but an event like this brings you back down to earth with a bump. Ego can be a terrible thing. :)
  • I feel like some teams at Oracle are completely divorced from reality. I am on the coal face. I speak with people on a daily basis who are struggling with some of the these products, for a variety of reasons. I don’t want to get all bitchy about this (I do really), but it feels like the classic “them and us” situation you always see between I.T. and their users, but in this case, us DBAs and developers are the users. There are some teams at Oracle who are fantastic at engaging with their community. I’m thinking APEX and Linux to name but a few, but there are others who… Well… Not so much… I feel the constant negative press about Oracle’s shady sales tactics are hurting Oracle at business level. What they really don’t need is people like me who have been rabid advocates of the technology for 20 years thinking, “Ahh f**k it! Time for something new!”, which is exactly how I felt at times during these two days.
  • It feels like some areas of Oracle are running scared, or at the very least, totally directionless, at the moment. I guess in this day and age, with a new “cool kid on the block” every 5 minutes, you’ve got to hedge your bets somewhat, but it gives me an uneasy feeling. Weakness elicits either a nurturing or attack response. I guess it says a lot about me, but in this case weakness triggers my attack mechanism. I want Oracle to be strong and fearless, not another one of those tech companies who bounce around aimlessly before falling into obscurity.
  • Jetlag.

I was very vocal during these two days. I’m pretty sure some speakers felt I gave them a hard time. Some of that is obviously born out of this frustration. I would like to apologise to any of the speakers who felt I was picking on them. I wasn’t. I just want this stuff to work so badly. I want people to say, “Wow. That’s f**kin’ amazing!” I want people to like Oracle. I want Oracle to be successful. This is totally selfish, because I want my knowledge and skills to remain relevant. It is in my interest that Oracle stay top of the pile.

Anyway, enough this emotional nonsense!

Over the next few days, you are going to see a large number of announcements. Many are quite obvious. There are normal release cycles you can predict. You know every other word is going to be cloud. :) Having said that, try and look through the marketing and you will find some really cool stuff underneath. I think when the dust settles, a lot of people will find a lot to be happy about. I hope I’m one of them!



PS. This is not a rallying cry. This is just a tired, fat, old man venting. Nothing to see here. Please move along…

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 : ACE Director Briefing : Final Thoughts was first posted on October 24, 2015 at 3:52 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Paging dr. DBA

So I have been building an API in pl/sql for Airbrake, a web based service, where you can track your run-time errors. The only problem is, that you don't always sit at your computer with the Airbrake dashboard open. So what to do when there is a serious error and you want to get alerted, or there is something that goes wrong in a business process or a batch job?

Luckily there are several options available. One of them is pagerduty, and they have an api you can connect to as well. So I have created a small package that can connect to your pagerduty account, and trigger/acknowledge/resolve incidents. There are of course many more options in the api, such as creating Teams, Escalation policies and on-duty schedules, and I will be adding those options over the next 2 weeeks.